the scents bring back memories and make me feel good — I LOVE fall!  And I love fall diffuser blends!  The changing colors of the leaves, sweater weather, fireplace nights with a bowl of popcorn and a movie, a breath of crisp air, cuddling up with a good book, Thanksgiving dinner, pumpkin carving, wearing scarves again, baking cookies & pies, apple picking, jumping in leaves, roasting marshmallows, crisp hikes, making stews and chili, Eskimo kisses to warm the nose, chimney smoke, hot apple cider, being wrapped in cozy blankets, hay rides, farmers’ markets, and cinnamon everything.  Filling my home with these fall diffuser blends, evokes warm memories and makes me feel good.
But she is my sister, so I gave the oils a try.  I put 3-5 drops of lavender essential oil in a diffuser by my bed.  Turned the diffuser on.  Climbed into bed and drifted off to sleep.  Next thing I knew my alarm was going off.  I had slept straight through the night for a full 8 hours!!  “But how could this be?”, I thought.  It must have been a fluke.  Maybe I was just so exhausted from the day before and that’s why I didn’t wake up?
It’s worth it to have a high quality diffuser to diffuse essential oils. This Smiley Daisy Essential Oil Diffuser, Quite Cool Mist Humidifier, 350 ml has been around for a long while and has great reviews. Smiley Daisy is a cold air diffuser, as well as a humidifier, which is great because it releases moisture into the air and is helpful in providing relief for dry skin, dry throat and cold and flu symptoms such as irritated nasal passages and more. Order below:
Hi, Jesslyn. Essential oils do have shelf-lives as do base oils (also known as carrier oils). The shelf-life will vary based on each oil so you’ll want to research each oil in your DIY blend to find that information as well as any carrier oil you add your EO blend into. When stored properly, most EOs and EO blends diluted in carrier oils will last 1-2 years. Hope that helps!
I could be wrong, but I think Danika is confusing the term therapeutic grade with the “100% Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade” that doTERRA coined and uses. Some oils are labeled for aromatherapy only, and others state they are therapeutic grade which I imagine is to indicate they are also for medicinal purposes. Not referring to ingestion, but topical applications.
Too bad valerian smells like stinky feet, because it really does the trick when it comes to getting a good nights rest. Valerian has been used in many different ways for centuries to reduce stress, tension and instill a sense of peace and tranquility. You’ll definitely want to mask this scent with a blend. While it is pricey, and a bit of an acquired smell, this is definitely one of the most effective essential oils for insomnia.
Oh, lavender essential oil is great, and I’d definitely consider it a go-to oil. It’s an easy one for beginners to use, it’s mostly safe, and it has a lot of different uses. I didn’t exclude it from the list for any particular reason. I just went through and tried to select oils with different notes so people would have a good variety of EO choices when making their blends. Hope that answers your question!

Loved your article. It helps me understand a bit more. I bought a bottle of pure patchouli oil recently. I have always loved the smell of patchouli. I was overwhelmed with how strong the smell was. I was wanting it for like and air freshener in my home, but way too strong to use alone. I have these goat milk soap that are scented patchouli and orange, which I just love. So I got the bright idea to mix my patchouli oil with orange oil. What I like to know do you think I should use a carrier oil like jojoba to tone the scent down if needs be? And will it change the scent at all?
Real sandalwood is hard to come by these days, because the Indian government’s export limitations, but if you can get your hands on it, and suffer from insomnia-snatch it up! This delightful aroma really helps reduce anxiety and stress all while promoting relaxation. It has been used for over 4 millennia all over the world for its comforting, therapeutic properties and wonderful smell.

hi meagan – thanks for your post – i have a lot to read and learn on mixing blends for essential oils – i am having so much trouble because i make CP soap – and so many essential oils can disappear during the saponification process – i have managed a couple of blends but they are masculine in perfume – i so want to find an easy blend of no more than 3 oils that will be feminine and for some reason conjure up the seep south and scarlett – i dont live anywhere near there or even in that country but i have a perfume in my head that i just cant for the life of me create. Is there any chance you could point me in the right direction???
For toddlers, using essential oils may be an alternative approach for sleep issues or deprivation. The most commonly used essential oils include chamomile, lavender, eucalyptus, and lemongrass. Users should obtain doctors approval prior to using any essential oils for toddler sleep issues. Talk to your doctor about proper dosing and the best method of delivery for your child.

Next, try diluting your blend in a carrier oil. You can take 4 drops of any carrier oil such as jojoba, sweet almond, grapeseed, avocado, or any oil you’d like (preferably one without a strong scent) and add 1 drop of your essential oil blend to it. You now have a 20% dilution. Now smell it? What do you think? Does that change the scent? What do you notice first? How does it make you feel now? Describe your thoughts in your notebook.


*sigh* this EO thing is so overwhelming. I can’t find anything that says what to do once you’ve mixed an oil blend. Do you apply it to a specific part of the body? I am looking for blends that will focus and calm myself and 8 yr old son…Both for home and school/work. I am seeing several blends to try…but don’t know what to do with them when they’re created. Any help?


What most don’t know is that even the labeled 100% pure are not always what they seem and it’s not the companies fault it’s just not available for the regular oil trader. For example, a Sandalwood tree can only produce the oil after the tree has reached it’s 30 year maturity, and since this is such a necessity to India it is only “doled” out to the consumer as a partially pure oil. India has no regulations about the purity they are distributing, so unless you are paying almost $30 an oz. it’s most likely not truly pure, this is the same for absolutes. Absolutes are 100% pure, and they are most expensive and usually very thick.
When it comes to essential oils, you get what you pay for. YEs, there are plenty of brands out there than claim to be 100% pure (heck, you can even get “pure” lavender oil from Wal-Mart, which testing results show is not even true lavender oil…), but just because an oil claims to be 100% pure does not mean it is of the same-quality, or contains the same constituents as a properly-sourced oil. doTERRA sources their oils from all over the world and is committed to paying growers and farmers fair wages. Think “fair trade coffee”, but with essential oils instead. In other instances with other companies, oils are often purchased in bulk from middlemen, and they farmers are not paid fairly for their work. A high-quality product priced in a way to support farmers to produce the highest-quality oils as possible (many in third-world countries) is not the same as a company “greedy for money”.
They make jewelry now that can hold oils…like lava stones, which you can put a few drops right on…and, several different types, depending on how many stones…..or a necklace that holds stones, or a little piece of felt, or a little cloth ball. The jewelry has a spot that opens and closes, so you can add whichever method, and scent you choose. My son wears a lava stone bracelet for his anxiety, and then some veviter to help his ADD. I have several pieces that I use for myself. Google them, or look on Ebay or Amazon.
Thank you a million times for this post. My son turned 2 in December. I have not had a full night’s sleep since he was born. I was becoming very desperate. I read this post and decided to give it a go. I combine Cedarwood, frankincense and ylang ylang in my diffuser. My son still sleeps in our bed most nights, but at least now we all get a full 8 hours. Thank you again!
You can find the essential oils, other ingredients and packaging that you need by patronizing the fine companies that support AromaWeb with their banner advertising located throughout AromaWeb (See them all at a glance within the Advertiser Spotlight area) and the listings located within the Global and Regional Aromatherapy Business Directories. Many of AromaWeb's advertisers also expertly formulate their own ready-made products if you decide you'd rather not make aromatherapy products yourself.
Hi Meagan, Thanks for sharing, you really broke the process down in an easy to understand way. Wish I had the oils you used in the example so I could try it out. I’m going to read more of your blog. I do have a question though, I think you said you’ve used Eden’s Garden and Young Living. I’ve been using Eden’s Garden for 2 years now and since I never tried anything else I am very satisfied, just needed an opinion from someone else to help me in my research. Today I went to a class and made YL Thieves Disinfectant spray. All the oils she let us smell seemed more fragrant than my EG EOs, I was wondering if you ever noticed that and what may be the reason. I’m not sure how oils are “supposed” to smell, only that I did notice a slight difference.
I was introduced to dottera oils 4 years ago. I have also used other oils for diffusing. There is a huge difference between oils in my opinion. Although various oil manufacturers claim to be 100% pure you can tell the difference as compared to dottera which has purity in scent. Many oils have carrier oils added to them so although they claim to be pure they are not. Also dottera oils are therapeutic grade and many can be ingested safely. I believe if you are going to inhale a substance it should be 100% pure with no additives. As a nurse I know this is important. Just my opinion.
I’m sure this is in large amounts or if ingested. A small amount in a humidifier is not going to harm an animal I’m sure. Unless the owner was irresponsible about where they placed their humidifier and the animal knocked it over and drank it for some reason. But Jill seems to know a good deal about essential oils and has used them around her animals, I myself have been using them for years with my animals around not only in the humidifier.
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Hi, I came across your post and thought I would add my two cents. Your problem may be something other than dust mites. Dust mites live in mattresses and in bedding and feed on dead skin cells that we shed when we sleep. I know, this is disgusting. If you allergies are due to dust mites, this likely would not be affected by moving to a new place. If your, “new,” home is actually a newly built or remodeled, it is more likely you are experiencing chemical sensitivity to products used such as paint, chemicals used in laying carpet or flooring, etc. I had a horrible case of irritated eyes and allergies when we painted. If we ever paint again, I am going away for several days. There is not much to do about this except air the place out and wait. Or, if you have relocated to a different locale, there may be new allergens. You might try running your air conditioning colder and washing your hair prior to going to sleep, as allergens attach themselves to your hair and you inhale them while you sleep, waking up congested.
From my understanding, the total number of oils is not the safety concern, it’s the total amount of EOs used (the final dilution) that matters. While there are various dilution guidelines, these are the most recent recommendations from aromatherapists I respect. Products that cover large portions of your body and sit on the skin for long periods of time (like lotions) need to be diluted more (1-2% depending on the strength of the EOs used). Products that don’t sit on the skin for long (like body washes) can be diluted less (around 5-10%, again depending on the strength of the oils used). Products that cover larger portions of skin (salve with EOs) should be more diluted (2-3%) compared to products that cover smaller portions of skin (roller bottle spot applications) which can be less diluted (5%). Age and health will also be a factor in dilution amounts. Children and the elderly need their EOs to be diluted more as their livers are slower at metabolizing EO chemicals than a healthy teenager or adult liver. Dilution also depends on the strength of the oil. For example, cinnamon bark requires more dilution than cinnamon leaf. Does this make sense? A lot of EO books (like this one) give recommendations and guidelines for this sort of thing.

Getting a good night's sleep can sometimes feel as impossible and frustrating as trying to lick your elbow (if you've never tried it, I bet you just did — I see you, fam). There are a lot of different sleep aids on the market, but personally, I think adding some essential oils to your nightly routine is one of the best ways to get a good snooze. Many essential oils are specifically dedicated to helping you doze off, and combining some of these relaxing, fragrant substances into essential oil blends for sleep is a surefire way to reap all the bedtime benefits you're searching for.
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