Many people prefer to use essential oils because they’re natural and don’t create the common side effects associated with many sleep medications, such as daytime drowsiness or more serious health risks. For example, a 2010 study found smelling jasmine to be just as effective at calming the nerves as a sleeping pill or sedative, but without any adverse side effects.
Leslie wants to create an energizing essential oil blend for herself. She plans on diffusing it during her morning shower, and her goal is to feel more awake, energized, and uplifted. She wants her essential oil blend to be a combination of aromatic blending (blended primarily for fragrance) and therapeutic blending (blended primarily for an emotional or physical effect).
Sleep is one of the most important and restorative processes for our body, and when we don’t get a proper amount of restful, uninterrupted sleep that we need, there are quite a few negative effects on our overall health. Fortunately, there are many excellent essential oils for sleep, which can leave you refreshed, rested and ready to face the world.
Hi – My family and I have been using essential oils for 10 years. We are 100% believers in their healing powers. I turned essential oils into a business about 4 years ago, due to my first hand knowledge of their amazing properties. To address some of the diffuser comments and questions above, you do not need a nebulizing diffuser to enjoy the benefits of oils. Ultrasonic diffusers that use water do an excellent job of transporting oils in the air. And, though nebulizers provide an intense essential oil experience, they take a lot of oil to run and they run through that oil quickly. Now, if you’re water source is compromised, this can degrade the oil. We have, however, made a push to provide all types of diffuser options to our customers. If you don’t like plastic diffusers, we have ceramic. If you don’t want ceramic, we have glass. If you don’t want ultrasonic with water, we have nebulizing diffusers. If anyone has any questions, please reach out. We’ve been using oils daily, for a long time. Happy to answer any question or address concerns the best I can. Thanks
I have used Organic Infusions oils for over 7 years now and I love them. They are the highest quality and vibration that I have found and their efforts for maintaining purity are remarkable! My favorite is the Rose Otto oil for daily skin use (I add 10 drops to a 2 oz bottle of my skincare cream and stir it in) and I also like using lemon and grapefruit daily in my diffuser and in my laundry, along with Lemongrass. I use daily in winter the blend Immune Protection and am rarely sick! A fabulous company with no monthly order requirements or stress that other companies require. I like to order when I order and that’s that! I am so happy to have found Organic Infusions and to benefit from these amazing oils! Thank you ever so much!!! ~ Teresa T.
Like most people I am new to mixing EO’s. First, I would like to say thank you for all your time and hard work you put into this article. Most people don’t realize how much time goes into the trial and error process. It seems you have done a lot of hard work and a good job for us all to take into consideration. I would like to know if you have to rest it 24 hours if you are going to be putting it in an oil burner or a diffuser? I would be mixing something for calming and concentration. I homeschool and my DD needs something to help her stay focused and my patience is being test greatly right now.

These recipes are offered for educational purposes only. Before using any essential oil, carefully read AromaWeb's Essential Oil Safety Information page. For in-depth information on oil safety issues, read Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young. Do not take any oils internally and do not apply undiluted essential oils, absolutes, CO2s or other concentrated essences onto the skin without advanced essential oil knowledge or consultation from a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. For general dilution information, read AromaWeb's Guide to Diluting Essential Oils. If you are pregnant, epileptic, have liver damage, have cancer, or have any other medical problem, use oils only under the proper guidance of a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. Use extreme caution when using oils with children and consult a qualified aromatherapy practitioner before using oils with children, the elderly, if you have medical issues or are taking medications.
Hey Shelley! Good for you for starting to add EOs to your soaps. I love scented, homemade soaps! As for what oils to mix with the ones you already have, let me direct you back to the post on blending. It will help you find other EOs to add to the ones you have and to come up with blends that work for your soaps. Figure out what categories and notes the oils you have are and then work on finding other oils that complement them. It’s hands on. You have to get oils and try out different blends and decide on what YOU like. Lastly, “apple” is not an essential oil… it’s a fragrance oil and it isn’t considered natural. If you’re going for “all natural” soaps and scents you may want to rethink that one. You could replace it with chamomile as many people think chamomile has an apple-like scent. You’ll need to decide if Roman chamomile or German Chamomile is better. Thanks for your comment, and I hope this has helped you some.
Lavender is said to ease tension and induce relaxation. In studies done by Britain’s University of Southampton, they found that participants who diffused lavender oil at night ranked their sleep an average of 20% better than the placebo group. Newer research done by Wesleyan University confirms these findings. When combined with roman chamomile it delivers a knock-out punch for insomnia.
This is a crude list… a rough draft of sorts. You will not be using all of the essential oils you put on this list, and you are not concerning yourself with essential oil brands at this point. You’re basically gathering a lot of ideas and information here. The idea is to come up with a list of 10-20 essential oils to get you started, and as you progress through the steps for blending essential oils, you’ll begin to simplify this big list.
Glad to hear you’re finding the info helpful. I’ve never heard of the Majestic Pure brand before so I can’t comment on how strong it is. I always look for EOs from brands I know and trust that are high-quality, pure oils. If you can’t smell your blend well once it’s added to your alcohol, it could be that your dilution rate is off. I’m not sure. If you’re looking for a good company with a lot of oil choices, be sure to check out Edens Garden essential oils. They offer pure EOs, and they carry a ton of scents!
I’m glad you liked the article Jennie. I’m no expert when it comes to aromatherapy so I’d definitely search some other aromatherapy blogs like LearningAboutEOs.com and the Aromahead Blog for arthritis blends, but I think I’d make a cayenne salve like the one here and then add essential oils that contain menthol like peppermint or wintergreen to it.
Hey Shelley! Good for you for starting to add EOs to your soaps. I love scented, homemade soaps! As for what oils to mix with the ones you already have, let me direct you back to the post on blending. It will help you find other EOs to add to the ones you have and to come up with blends that work for your soaps. Figure out what categories and notes the oils you have are and then work on finding other oils that complement them. It’s hands on. You have to get oils and try out different blends and decide on what YOU like. Lastly, “apple” is not an essential oil… it’s a fragrance oil and it isn’t considered natural. If you’re going for “all natural” soaps and scents you may want to rethink that one. You could replace it with chamomile as many people think chamomile has an apple-like scent. You’ll need to decide if Roman chamomile or German Chamomile is better. Thanks for your comment, and I hope this has helped you some.
Any idea’s on blends for autism? CBD oil I think is going to change everything, it’s taken away 95% of my autism symptoms and I’m going in public now. Also off all 5 synthetic prescription and testing different blends with frankencense, vanilla, lavendar, and peppermint I got. I like those but I would like some woody smells. I’m not sure, I just can’t afford to keep buying a new bottle at a time for $10.
Just because these two brands frequently recommend taking essential oils internally doesn’t mean their brands can be and others can’t. It just means they give unsafe advice that is contrary to what any real aromatherapist would advise. People have gotten seriously hurt by following this advice. The International Association of Holistic Aromatherapist says that essential oils should never be taken internally unless you are advised to do so by a clinical aromatherapist who has appropriate training in anatomy, physiology, chemistry, etc. This has nothing to do with oil purity and everything to do with the fact that essential oils are very powerful.
I have a question for you….my husband has an Orthostatic Tremor which means he tremors when he stands up….not when sitting. His dr. and I believe that it was brought on my emotional stress which means it can be reversed (my husband thinks it is a lifetime sentence). It is limiting what he can do physically and emotionally is causing havic. He is on antidepresents and seeing a counselor. I believe in the healing power of essential oils…I use theives oil all the time. Do you have any suggestions for an oil mix that might help him? thank you

I’ve never used it before, Joan, but I would imagine a little would go a long way and that it would be a great addition to muscle blends! I’d also guess it would fall into the “spicy” category of essential oils, and I would also decrease its total amount in any blend I made it in as it’s probably a very strong oil. I do use cayenne along with some other essential oils in the muscle rub blend that I make for my medicine cabinet. You can find that recipe in my How To Make Herbal Ointments, Salves, and Balms: The Ultimate How-To Guide if you’re interested.
In the United States alone, more than 40 million people suffer from chronic sleep disorders, and another 20 million suffer from acute sleep problems. These disorders can range from chronic insomnia to daytime sleepiness, restless leg syndrome, and various other sleep problems related to substance abuse, anxiety, depression, medication interactions and chemical imbalances. Pharmaceuticals prescribed for sleep disorders can often have extreme side effects and leave people feeling sluggish throughout their day. Experts recommend 7-9 hours of uninterrupted sleep per day for adults, yet in our fast-paced and demanding modern world, this can be very difficult.
Loved your article. It helps me understand a bit more. I bought a bottle of pure patchouli oil recently. I have always loved the smell of patchouli. I was overwhelmed with how strong the smell was. I was wanting it for like and air freshener in my home, but way too strong to use alone. I have these goat milk soap that are scented patchouli and orange, which I just love. So I got the bright idea to mix my patchouli oil with orange oil. What I like to know do you think I should use a carrier oil like jojoba to tone the scent down if needs be? And will it change the scent at all?

If we could spend each day of the week swimming in the ocean, boating on a lake, or twirling in the rain, we would! There’s nothing that smells more amazing than the seaside or a summer storm, and each of these blends will remind you of your treasured aqua adventures. Grab your trusty diffuser, add some YL essential oils, and press “go” on crashing waves and swimming pool cannon balls!
From my understanding, the total number of oils is not the safety concern, it’s the total amount of EOs used (the final dilution) that matters. While there are various dilution guidelines, these are the most recent recommendations from aromatherapists I respect. Products that cover large portions of your body and sit on the skin for long periods of time (like lotions) need to be diluted more (1-2% depending on the strength of the EOs used). Products that don’t sit on the skin for long (like body washes) can be diluted less (around 5-10%, again depending on the strength of the oils used). Products that cover larger portions of skin (salve with EOs) should be more diluted (2-3%) compared to products that cover smaller portions of skin (roller bottle spot applications) which can be less diluted (5%). Age and health will also be a factor in dilution amounts. Children and the elderly need their EOs to be diluted more as their livers are slower at metabolizing EO chemicals than a healthy teenager or adult liver. Dilution also depends on the strength of the oil. For example, cinnamon bark requires more dilution than cinnamon leaf. Does this make sense? A lot of EO books (like this one) give recommendations and guidelines for this sort of thing.
Only using pure essential oils free of additives or synthetic ingredients is especially important when using essential oils to help your baby sleep. Check both the oil and the carrier oil’s lists of ingredients to ensure they don’t contain anything your baby is allergic to, such as peanut oil. Although it can be safe for adults, you should never apply undiluted essential oils directly to your baby’s skin or allow them to ingest the oil.
Clary sage is one of the most relaxing, internally balancing, and soothing essential oils out there, and it will provide a potent and soothing aroma to your bedroom throughout the night. Combined with the floral scent of ylang ylang and the earthy musk of sandalwood, you'll be sleeping soundly the minute you cuddle up with your favorite fuzzy blanket.

This blending ratio doesn’t have a drop limit, but keep in mind that you want your blend to stay small so you don’t waste your oils (in case you don’t like it). You’ll be keeping track of your essential oils and drops on paper. This blending ratio works well with pure combinations (essential oils from one category) and mixed combinations (essential oils from complementary categories).

Hi, Jesslyn. Essential oils do have shelf-lives as do base oils (also known as carrier oils). The shelf-life will vary based on each oil so you’ll want to research each oil in your DIY blend to find that information as well as any carrier oil you add your EO blend into. When stored properly, most EOs and EO blends diluted in carrier oils will last 1-2 years. Hope that helps!
You can definitely add essential oils to lotion bases. The ratio will depend on the essential oils in the mix and how much area of the body they will cover. This will definitely require more research and perhaps consulting from an aromatherapist. There are also a lot of great books out there that teach you how to use essential oils in skin care products that could offer more information as well. Hope this answers your question!

You can definitley combine both, Elizabeth. The ratio is totally your choice depending on what helps you. One thing you could do would be to make two separate personal inhalers (one with rosemary and one with lavender) and take a few deep breaths of the rosemary as needed, then, if you start feeling too anxious, start using the lavender one to calm you a bit. Maybe try it BEFORE you take a test… like during a study session, to see if it helps or not. Best of luck in your studies… I remember a lot of late nights getting ready for those big tests!

What most don’t know is that even the labeled 100% pure are not always what they seem and it’s not the companies fault it’s just not available for the regular oil trader. For example, a Sandalwood tree can only produce the oil after the tree has reached it’s 30 year maturity, and since this is such a necessity to India it is only “doled” out to the consumer as a partially pure oil. India has no regulations about the purity they are distributing, so unless you are paying almost $30 an oz. it’s most likely not truly pure, this is the same for absolutes. Absolutes are 100% pure, and they are most expensive and usually very thick.
I have some laser burns on my face that I’m trying to get rid of (the “professional” used the wrong laser, and now I have reddish brown nickel sized burns on my face). I’ve researched and found that Geranium, Helichrysum, Lavender, Neroli, and a few others are good for scars, burns, etc and they all blend well together. My question is can I blend them all (since they each have a unique power, if you will) and how much do I use of each?
Once you have your essential oils categorized, it’s time to see which oils will possibly combine well with each other. And, just as categorizing essential oils is subjective, so is combining categories. Ultimately, there are no absolutes when it comes to blending essential oils. That’s the art of essential oil blending! It’s totally based on your preferences and how the oil smells to you. Now with that being said, there are a couple of guidelines that are good for beginners to follow.
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