Sweet marjoram is not only a good herb for cooking, but also a popular essential oil used to aid sleep. Almost no research has been conducted to confirm or disprove its sedative properties. But Sweet marjoram essential oil is thought to improve voluntary breathing in asthmatic patients. (6) It is possible that involuntary breathing, such as that which accompanies sleep, is also improved. Those with sleep apnea may want to try sweet marjoram oil to keep their breathing even through the night.

These blends are intended for diffuser use by adults. Less is more with essential oils. These blends are undiluted and some blends contain phototoxic oils. They should not be applied topically. Because these blends include essential oils that can be very relaxing, avoid diffusing these blends while driving or when you need full focus. Be sure to follow all safety precautions and always research the safety info and contraindications for each essential oil that you are considering working with. Aromatherapy should not be used as a substitute for proper medical treatment.

Weird question- how can you switch from mix to mix in the same diffuser without having crossover? Is cleaning it out very complicated? And how to inhibit mold growth in the cold air diffuser- is it just a bonus that the EOs are anti bacterial/biotic/fungal or do you have to add some other ingredient? (I did read the article, I just didn’t see it, but it’s almost 1 am, so that may be why, lol)
Too bad valerian smells like stinky feet, because it really does the trick when it comes to getting a good nights rest. Valerian has been used in many different ways for centuries to reduce stress, tension and instill a sense of peace and tranquility. You’ll definitely want to mask this scent with a blend. While it is pricey, and a bit of an acquired smell, this is definitely one of the most effective essential oils for insomnia.
You’ll also want to go back through your list and evaluate your essential oils for safety. The safety of an essential oil will largely be determined based on how it is used (inhalation, topical, internal), and this can be a complex topic that will require more research on your part. Most essential oil suppliers will have safety information in their product descriptions so this can be a good place to look as can other websites and books dedicated to essential oil safety.

thank you for your facts. I have a friend who only uses doterra..and she takes some internally. She is in school for herbology and thinks she knows everything about EO’s, and tells me how Doterra is the only one that sells “theropudic grade” EO and they sell all thats is out there. But i already researched that web site and saw that they did not sell ALL. Because I have done my research(google)lol, and now I have books by several reputable practitioners/authors[Lawless,Worwood,Grady]. I have told her that she is being mis informed about her EO usage and needs to be more cautious. But her response is always; oh dont worry..we are of mother earth..my family has been doing this for decades.(her family are descendents of an Indian culture, as is most of us..lol) so i will be fine, she says. well this is the generation of the hard headed(she is only 22, I be 47 so imma leave her to od on EO i guess..lol)


Multiple studies have found bergamot essential oil both induces the physiological changes that accompany sleep – like reduced heart rate and blood pressure – as well as reduces the thoughts that keep people up at night, like feelings of stress and anxiety. However, bergamot is photosensitive and makes your skin more sensitive to the sun, so topical applications should be avoided before going outside.
Humm, I can’t tell you much without seeing the version of the EO you purchased, Valerie, but one reason why they could have said that is that the EO you bought is a cold-pressed orange EO which can cause photosensitivity after sun exposure. Cold-pressed citrus oils are known to do that, as well as a few others. Here’s a great post on this topic. What you can do is use it for flavoring things, cleaning, diffusing, or in your skin care products during the winter months when you won’t get as much sun exposure and purchase a steam-distilled orange EO to use during the summer months. Hope this helps!
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