One of my favorite kinds of cookies as a young girl was snickerdoodles.  I just loved helping my mom by flattening out the balls of cookie dough with the bottom of a glass and then watching the cookies expand in the oven.  The characteristic cracking of the cinnamon sugar coating was so fun to watch happen.  This snickerdoodle diffuser blends bring back those childhood memories with it’s sweet, cinnamon aroma.  It’s a great blend to diffuser when I’m feeling a little on edge, as it helps to put me in a good mood and helps me to feel less stressed.

Please note: Products mentioned in this article have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products and information on this page are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This website is not a substitute for professional care.  Always consult your medical doctor regarding your medical care. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

Yes Lauren… there are many EOs that aren’t to be used on small children which is why I put the disclaimer about eucalyptus EO below the graphic encouraging parents to do more research on safe EOs for small children. This list is for children in general, it’s not age specific. I also link to my posts on EO safety which addresses age related concerns. Thanks for the link though!! I’m so glad to see more people using EOs safely in age appropriate ways.
These recipes are offered for educational purposes only. Before using any essential oil, carefully read AromaWeb's Essential Oil Safety Information page. For in-depth information on oil safety issues, read Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young. Do not take any oils internally and do not apply undiluted essential oils, absolutes, CO2s or other concentrated essences onto the skin without advanced essential oil knowledge or consultation from a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. For general dilution information, read AromaWeb's Guide to Diluting Essential Oils. If you are pregnant, epileptic, have liver damage, have cancer, or have any other medical problem, use oils only under the proper guidance of a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. Use extreme caution when using oils with children and consult a qualified aromatherapy practitioner before using oils with children, the elderly, if you have medical issues or are taking medications.
Your information is the best the best I’ve read yet! I’ve just started using essential oils…I use them in my diffuser at night, as it helps my eternally stuffy nose from allergies. Any scents seem to help, as I believe it’s the moisture it puts into the air that helps. I’ve been using a blend of Bergamot and Lemongrass. Both are made by Majestic Pure, and do just fine.
Great points Angie. I really love the work Lea Harris is doing at LearningAboutEOs.com when she tests all the different oils and shows the results. Even the big companies are noticing and thanking her for doing that… including doTERRA and Young Living… which says a lot about the companies not minding other people testing their products because they have confidence in what they’re selling.
I’m happy to say that the decision to create signature scents for my products (along with updating my branding and taking new photos) completely changed my business. I was invited to some pretty prestigious Etsy teams, my products were featured on Etsy’s front page over and over again, sales were coming in daily, I had repeat customers who were not only buying my products for themselves but as gifts too, and I had wholesale accounts and blog features… all because I made some simple, small changes to my products.
As you’re using essential oils, pay attention to how you feel. Scent is a highly individual experience. Each of us react to smells differently. The right scents for your relaxation and sleep are the ones that make you feel relaxed and sleepy! You may need to experiment with different oils before you find the right one for your nightly routine. If a scent makes you feel alert and awake, it is NOT the right one for sleep. But you can use it in the morning to help get you rolling into your day.
Like most people I am new to mixing EO’s. First, I would like to say thank you for all your time and hard work you put into this article. Most people don’t realize how much time goes into the trial and error process. It seems you have done a lot of hard work and a good job for us all to take into consideration. I would like to know if you have to rest it 24 hours if you are going to be putting it in an oil burner or a diffuser? I would be mixing something for calming and concentration. I homeschool and my DD needs something to help her stay focused and my patience is being test greatly right now.
so many other benefits of essential oils – Depending on the specific essential oils used, the diffuser blend can also help improve focus, give me an energy boost, calm me down and help me relax when I’m feeling stressed, clean & purify the air in my home, help my get a great night’s sleep, and more.  I’ve tried to point out some of these essential oils benefits in the descriptions of the fall diffuser blends below.
This is so perfect. I have been studying so much on herbs and oils. I make my own herbal tea blends that I sell. I just finished mixing the oils for a calming aromatherapy oil. I used a 1oz bottle. I kind of go big or go home… And this is my first go at it. It has lavender, majorim, orange sweet, and sandlewood. They are “resting” now. I like to use oil like this before bed. So I decided to try my own mixture with what I have learned and my favorite and most soothing smells. I will then mix the rest with my carrier oil and have my first ounce of a blend. But it’s just for me. If it turns out well… I may make roll on scents to sell in my shop!
Sleep deficiency may start suddenly or may slowly become a habit over time. On a day-to-day basis, sleep deficiency can affect learning, memory recall, decision making, the ability to deal with change, and how we express our emotions or behaviors. Chronic sleep deficiency can increase the risk of certain health problems, such as obesity, high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke.1
Thank you so much for this information, and the links you have provided. I’m new to this whole world of oils and thoroughly confused. One of my 9 year old sons has ADHD, Autism, severe anxiety and phobias, and a severe peanut allergy. On top of all of that he has a higher heart rate due to the anxiety and phobias setting everything else off, and cannot take any medications to help calm him down. He goes to therapy and social skills twice a week and has TSS workers at home and at school, but he still suffers and I needed to find something to help him without modern medicines in the mix. As it turns out, his therapy center is directly next door to a place called Penn Herb Company, so we ventured in to inquire about alternatives. He took a big sniff when we went in and I could see him relax. They helped me get a small stash of relaxing oils and make him a “calm down potion.” It worked every time I tried it on him before full meltdown. I am now on a mission to help him and the whole family get better without chemical medicines, but cannot spend hours in a store or classroom, or even at my computer (I have 4 boys, 2 of them not school aged yet and I stay at home to raise them) so sites like yours are now my lifeblood. Everyone else seems to have a grand opinion on a brand of oil and says the others are no good. It is so hard to decipher some of this stuff. It is awesome to have someone give the truth about different brands, and their claims. All the best to you, and thank you so much again from the bottom of this Mama’s overflowing heart!!!!
I love lavender and chamomile for their calming and relaxing properties. We too use them a lot. I love making fabric sprays with some vodka, water, and eos and spritzing the sheets and pillows. It doesn’t smell of alcohol and my kids can do it before bed which is fun for them. Plus it dilutes the oils so I don’t have to worry about them being too strong for them. I love that lavender and chamomile are even safe for young babies! Thanks for the tip!

When creating essential oil blends, the ratio I almost always follow is what I call the “30-50-20 Rule.” This is an essential oil blending ratio where you use 30% of your top note oil, 50% of your middle note oil, and 20% of your base note oil in your blend. This blending ratio consists of 10 total drops of essential oils, totaling 100% once combined.
Hi, Jesslyn. Essential oils do have shelf-lives as do base oils (also known as carrier oils). The shelf-life will vary based on each oil so you’ll want to research each oil in your DIY blend to find that information as well as any carrier oil you add your EO blend into. When stored properly, most EOs and EO blends diluted in carrier oils will last 1-2 years. Hope that helps!
You can definitely blend them all together Elizabeth, but I’d add in a base note oil (and maybe even another middle note oil) if it were me to round the blend out a bit more. Those oils are very floral and light so I’d add a couple others in to bring it down some, but that’s just me. If you like that scent, you can just use those and that’s it. Especially if you’re using it as a spot treatment sort of thing.
ROSE and GERANIUM. These two essential oils have similar floral scents, and both have been shown to reduce stress and anxiety, on their own and in combination with other essential oils. Some sleep experts recommend valerian as an essential oil for sleep aromatherapy. Valerian taken as a supplement can be highly beneficial for sleep. I wrote about valerian’s benefits for sleep and stress, here. But the smell of valerian is highly stinky! I recommend trying geranium or rose instead.

I’m a massage therapist and also a user of EOs. I really enjoyed reading this. I found it to be very helpful in understanding EOs and how to blend them by notes and by and by categories. This has been the most in depth I have seen anyone get into usage and blending. I apreciate how positive you are towards all brands of oils. I have bookmarked your page and will be back for more information.
In the post below and accompanying free printable, you’ll find what I think are the 30 best fall essential oil blends.  I’ve kept my most popular classic recipes and added 15 new fall diffuser recipes-  pumpkin pie, apple orchard, snickerdoodle cookies, sweater weather, orange cinnamon rolls, warm apple pie, evening by the fire, vanilla spice, crisp autumn, flannel, cozy home, and many more.  
Sleeping problems include a wide range of conditions. Some people battle to fall asleep. Others fall asleep easily but cannot remain asleep for long enough. Still, others fall and remain asleep, but their sleep is interrupted by bad dreams and/or physical movement of their arms and legs. All of these people are left feeling tired the next day. Find out how to use essential oil to treat these sleeping problems.
I believe sandalwood is a base not Annette. Of course you can combine whatever you like together if you think it smells good. I don’t think there are any black and white rules when it comes to blending as long as you have something from each note so your blend is “well rounded”. And from my understanding categories and notes are all relative to the other oils you’re referencing… they too are not black and white. Hope that helps some!
So again, I don’t know how to figure out the ratios except that the first ingredient is supposed to be the largest and they work their way down to less and less. You definitely could follow this as a guide and try blending small amounts of oil until you find a combination you like and seems to be effective on him. If it were me, I’d try to work through the process to come up with a good blend. I also have a post coming out in February that walks you through exactly how I blend oils. Maybe that will help you out some. Stay tuned, and thanks for your comment Tania!
JASMINE. A sweetly floral scent, jasmine appears to have serious sleep-promoting capabilities. Research shows jasmine improves sleep quality and cuts down on restless sleeping, as well as increasing daytime alertness. A 2002 study showed that jasmine delivered all of these sleep benefits, as well as lowering anxiety, even more effectively than lavender.
A quick thank you while my 15 month old son is sleeping. So glad I found you on my motherhood journey.  After 17 years of being childless (but envisioning a future life with a calm and peaceful soul), I gave birth at 43 to a larger-than-life, highly spirited, vocal baby whom I couldn’t relate to. Everyday has been a challenge to meet his ever increasing needs.  Your guidance has helped organize me and prepare me mentally more than any other blog or support group, thank you.
Loved your article. It helps me understand a bit more. I bought a bottle of pure patchouli oil recently. I have always loved the smell of patchouli. I was overwhelmed with how strong the smell was. I was wanting it for like and air freshener in my home, but way too strong to use alone. I have these goat milk soap that are scented patchouli and orange, which I just love. So I got the bright idea to mix my patchouli oil with orange oil. What I like to know do you think I should use a carrier oil like jojoba to tone the scent down if needs be? And will it change the scent at all?
ROSE and GERANIUM. These two essential oils have similar floral scents, and both have been shown to reduce stress and anxiety, on their own and in combination with other essential oils. Some sleep experts recommend valerian as an essential oil for sleep aromatherapy. Valerian taken as a supplement can be highly beneficial for sleep. I wrote about valerian’s benefits for sleep and stress, here. But the smell of valerian is highly stinky! I recommend trying geranium or rose instead.
Great points Angie. I really love the work Lea Harris is doing at LearningAboutEOs.com when she tests all the different oils and shows the results. Even the big companies are noticing and thanking her for doing that… including doTERRA and Young Living… which says a lot about the companies not minding other people testing their products because they have confidence in what they’re selling.
These blends are intended for diffuser use by adults. Less is more with essential oils. These blends are undiluted and some blends contain phototoxic oils. They should not be applied topically. Because these blends include essential oils that can be very relaxing, avoid diffusing these blends while driving or when you need full focus. Be sure to follow all safety precautions and always research the safety info and contraindications for each essential oil that you are considering working with. Aromatherapy should not be used as a substitute for proper medical treatment.
I just happened upon your site and I really like it. Everything is researched and well written. I’m saving this to come back again 🙂 I totally agree with you on cost not necessarily reflecting the quality of oil. While I agree that a low cost essential oil will usually indicate an adulteration, there are many smaller companies that have pure essential oils with reasonable prices.
LAVENDER. This is the most popular essential oil for sleep and relaxation among my patients, and my first, general go-to recommendation for people looking to try aromatherapy for sleep. Lavender is a soothing scent that’s long been associated with relaxation and sleep, and used as a natural remedy for anxiety. Lavender is probably the most rigorously studied essential oil. A robust body of research shows lavender has anxiety reducing—or anxiolytic—effects, as well as beneficial effects on depression. Lavender can also help with pain relief, several studies show. One recent study showed aromatherapy using lavender oil reduced the need for pain medications in a group of 6 to 12-year-old children recovering from having their tonsils removed. Lavender also has sedative effects, meaning it can work directly to help you fall asleep. A number of studies point to lavender’s effectiveness for sleep: improving sleep quality, increasing sleep amounts, and elevating daytime alertness, including in people with insomnia.
HELP I’m actually planning on making some home heat pads with jasmine rice. My plan was to use dried lavender and rosemary. I saw oils and a fixative would help the scent last in the herbs. So, making a “perfume blend” with lavender as my strongest scent, then rosemary, and oakmoss absolute as my fixative. I was going to put the rosemary and lavender buds in separate bowls with the majority of the rice in the lavender but a smaller portion set with the rosemary…then add a few drops of the essential oils to the separate bowls (rosemary probably 4-6) (lavender 8-12). After they’ve dried I’d like to combine everything and add my oak moss absolute … I want 2-3 drops I just have no idea how to help that spread TBH but this IS my plan-really hoping if you have any advice or experience about my plans to please share before I ruin everything lol THANK YOU!
To me, blend #1 sounds amazing! I imagine it to be fresh and sweet smelling with a touch of spice to ground it. Blend #2 feels like spring to me because it’s a pure floral blend. I can’t imagine preferring this blend over blend #1 because I tend to not like heavy floral scents, but you never know. Blend #3 sounds interesting, but I can’t say for sure what I think about it because I’m not familiar with angelica essential oil. The peppermint and pine sound like a great combination, but I’d have to test this to see what I thought of them alongside the angelica.
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