Since I have asthma, dust mites are a problem. I use a mattress pad that can be easily removed and washed. Make sure all bedding is machine washable in hot water, as this kills the mites. I put my down comforter in a washable duvet, so it can be washed weekly with the other bedding. I’m sure a spray of tea tree oil on the bedding couldn’t hurt. I put eucalyptus in my eo diffuser in my bedroom. I keep dust attracting items in closets or drawers, exchanged my dry-clean only bedroom curtains for washable ones and got rid of the hard to clean blinds. For kids, no stuffed animals in the bedroom unless they are machine washable.
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I have some laser burns on my face that I’m trying to get rid of (the “professional” used the wrong laser, and now I have reddish brown nickel sized burns on my face). I’ve researched and found that Geranium, Helichrysum, Lavender, Neroli, and a few others are good for scars, burns, etc and they all blend well together. My question is can I blend them all (since they each have a unique power, if you will) and how much do I use of each?

From my understanding, the total number of oils is not the safety concern, it’s the total amount of EOs used (the final dilution) that matters. While there are various dilution guidelines, these are the most recent recommendations from aromatherapists I respect. Products that cover large portions of your body and sit on the skin for long periods of time (like lotions) need to be diluted more (1-2% depending on the strength of the EOs used). Products that don’t sit on the skin for long (like body washes) can be diluted less (around 5-10%, again depending on the strength of the oils used). Products that cover larger portions of skin (salve with EOs) should be more diluted (2-3%) compared to products that cover smaller portions of skin (roller bottle spot applications) which can be less diluted (5%). Age and health will also be a factor in dilution amounts. Children and the elderly need their EOs to be diluted more as their livers are slower at metabolizing EO chemicals than a healthy teenager or adult liver. Dilution also depends on the strength of the oil. For example, cinnamon bark requires more dilution than cinnamon leaf. Does this make sense? A lot of EO books (like this one) give recommendations and guidelines for this sort of thing.

Sweet marjoram is not only a good herb for cooking, but also a popular essential oil used to aid sleep. Almost no research has been conducted to confirm or disprove its sedative properties. But Sweet marjoram essential oil is thought to improve voluntary breathing in asthmatic patients. (6) It is possible that involuntary breathing, such as that which accompanies sleep, is also improved. Those with sleep apnea may want to try sweet marjoram oil to keep their breathing even through the night.

FYI: under the blend for deodorizing animal accident odours, you have listed lemon , tea tree among other citrus oils known to be VERY toxic. I know Young Living touts their oils as “safe” for pets but it’s simply not true. Just ask my neighbour who killed her cat thinking that because she was using “Young Living” it would be fine. Limonene and other components are TOXIC in these oils for cats, they simply cannot metabolize them with their liver. I cringe when I see people gleefully telling how tea tree oil has prevented fleas in their cats..yeah, pretty soon they won’t have a cat for the fleas to bite. Do your research please! Aromatherapy is great but certain oils, tea-tree, clove, citrus oils for example are downright dangerous and can cause toxic overload or death. Regardless of brand used. Sorry I just felt I needed to post this to spare even 1 person heartache over losing a pet just not realizing the extreme potency of EO’s on pets/cats.
Like most people I am new to mixing EO’s. First, I would like to say thank you for all your time and hard work you put into this article. Most people don’t realize how much time goes into the trial and error process. It seems you have done a lot of hard work and a good job for us all to take into consideration. I would like to know if you have to rest it 24 hours if you are going to be putting it in an oil burner or a diffuser? I would be mixing something for calming and concentration. I homeschool and my DD needs something to help her stay focused and my patience is being test greatly right now.
Aaaah… sleep! Such a popular and much talked about topic. Lack of sleep can be harmful to any individual’s health and well-being, while adequate sleep assists in the retention of stamina and provision of energy that fuels you to function all day long. With an increase in everyday stress levels, hypertension, and the overall pace of life, individuals are resorting to all sorts of things to help improve sleep.
VANILLA. The sweet scent of vanilla is appealing to many people, and it has a long history of use for relaxation and stress relief. Vanilla can have sedative effects on the body. It can reduce hyperactivity and restlessness, quiet the nervous system, and lower blood pressure. It also appears to help relieve anxiety and depression, with a combining both relaxation and an uplift in mood. If the smell of cookies baking relaxes and soothes you, vanilla might be a scent to try for sleep—without the calories!
LAVENDER. This is the most popular essential oil for sleep and relaxation among my patients, and my first, general go-to recommendation for people looking to try aromatherapy for sleep. Lavender is a soothing scent that’s long been associated with relaxation and sleep, and used as a natural remedy for anxiety. Lavender is probably the most rigorously studied essential oil. A robust body of research shows lavender has anxiety reducing—or anxiolytic—effects, as well as beneficial effects on depression. Lavender can also help with pain relief, several studies show. One recent study showed aromatherapy using lavender oil reduced the need for pain medications in a group of 6 to 12-year-old children recovering from having their tonsils removed. Lavender also has sedative effects, meaning it can work directly to help you fall asleep. A number of studies point to lavender’s effectiveness for sleep: improving sleep quality, increasing sleep amounts, and elevating daytime alertness, including in people with insomnia.
I don’t know if there would be an exact way to figure it out without having it tested… if that’s even possible and it’s very expensive. You could blend your own together though… it may not be exactly the same, but would be close. I see they’re using 3 different types of eucalyptus as well as peppermint, myrtle, and marjoram. All these oils contain types of camphor with help with respiratory issues. Pine is a great oil for kids and works well for respiratory conditions. I couldn’t find much info on the Ravintsara except that it was like eucalyptus.
Jill, thank you for your blog post. I have never used essential oils. Thanks for the information on the different oils and the combinations. I have heard of essential oils, just was never sure which oils go together. I want to try them. I have 10 med size plastic containers full of candles of every shape and color for each season and plus some. In the closet and under the bed. I hardly use them much anymore, since they just don’t seem to hold the smell when they are burning. They just sit in the plastic boxes taking up space.
For toddlers, using essential oils may be an alternative approach for sleep issues or deprivation. The most commonly used essential oils include chamomile, lavender, eucalyptus, and lemongrass. Users should obtain doctors approval prior to using any essential oils for toddler sleep issues. Talk to your doctor about proper dosing and the best method of delivery for your child.
After testing your blend, if you like the scent and how it makes you feel, go with it. You can now make more of your blend, using larger amounts of oils, before bottling it up and labeling it. If you don’t like the scent or it doesn’t affect you the way you hoped it would, you can start the process over varying the amount of essential oils used or you can chose different oils all together.
Hi Meagan, I’m somewhat new to the EO world. I would like to make two blends as a gift (along with a diffuser) for my cousin who was newly diagnosed with breast cancer. I’d like one to be healing (I was thinking orange, lemongrass, thyme and frankincense). The other I’d like for her nausea (which I’d like to encorporate ginger and lemon). Do you have any advice?
Yes, vegetable oils or other forms of fat are the best way to properly dilute essential oils. I believe some aromatherapists say that mixing EOs with heavy whipping cream and adding that to baths is acceptable and safe as the fat in the cream helps disperse the oil, but as far as putting EOs on your skin goes… diluting them in a carrier oil is best. You can find some oils that aren’t greasy. I believe they’re called “dry oils.” Rosehip seed oil is an example, and there are several others. Maybe Google it to get some other examples. Hope this answers your question.
It’s key to purchase oils that are advertised as “pure” or “100%” essential oils and list the oil’s botanical Latin name. Ones that say “perfume oil” or “fragrance oil” often use synthetic ingredients, so while they smell nice, they don’t provide the same benefits and may even contain other additives more likely to irritate your skin. If possible, look for organic oils with a non-GMO or “Therapeutic grade” label, meaning they don’t have toxins and only use pure chemicals.
This is the point where the actual essential oils are needed, and as I’m sure you’re well aware, essential oils vary in price depending on the company you purchase your oils from. Some people prefer big MLM companies with higher priced oils, others prefer family-owned suppliers with mid-range prices, and some prefer well-known small businesses with lower priced essential oils. I say, to each his own. Just do your research and know how to choose high-quality essential oils before you purchase any.

Your information is the best the best I’ve read yet! I’ve just started using essential oils…I use them in my diffuser at night, as it helps my eternally stuffy nose from allergies. Any scents seem to help, as I believe it’s the moisture it puts into the air that helps. I’ve been using a blend of Bergamot and Lemongrass. Both are made by Majestic Pure, and do just fine.
NOW® essential oil blends make it easy for you to enjoy a variety of natural essences. The oils used in these blends have been carefully chosen and precisely mixed by our master aromatherapists to provide a scentsational balance of aromas that complement each other, and any mood, perfectly. As with all of our essential oils, these essential oil blends are clean, non-GMO, carefully sourced, quality assured, and purity tested.
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