Sign up below to download a PDF with 24 essential oils and the various ways they can be used… including oils in all eight blending categories! Once you sign up, you’ll get the download link in your inbox shortly as well as your special gift from Plant Therapy (one of my favorite essential oil companies)! Be sure to save the file to your computer for safekeeping, and print a copy out for quick access too!
I made a sugar scrub for the first time this holiday and the scents are “off”. Could it be because I used too much oil? It is not pleasant at all. I know the oils are good quality. The peppermint does not smell refreshing at all nor does the lavender. I am guessing I used too many drops. Can I dilute by doubling the sugar and coconut oil? Any recommendations so I can save the 5 cups I have so far?
For depression: Depression and sleep problems often go hand in hand. A number of studies have examined the effects of aromatherapy using essential oils in people with depression and depressive symptoms, both with and without anxiety. Aromatherapy can help improve depressive symptoms, according to the results of several studies. A study found aromatherapy improved both depression and anxiety in a group of post-partum women. And a 2016 analysis found aromatherapy effective in reducing stress and depression—as well as symptoms of menopause—in middle-aged women.

I also really enjoyed your information on blending. When I first started blending oils I didn’t know much so I would muscle test which ones I needed to use and in what quantity. It’s interesting as I am learning more of the “science” behind it, and I go back to my blend recipes and see how it all played out with the top, middle, and base notes, all in the correct quantities. It’s actually really fun to see. I am enjoying learning more, which makes me realize how much I don’t know!! 🙂


Once you have your essential oils categorized, it’s time to see which oils will possibly combine well with each other. And, just as categorizing essential oils is subjective, so is combining categories. Ultimately, there are no absolutes when it comes to blending essential oils. That’s the art of essential oil blending! It’s totally based on your preferences and how the oil smells to you. Now with that being said, there are a couple of guidelines that are good for beginners to follow.
Wonderful blog site! I just jumped into this EO stuff this week, with little forethought. I wanted some natural bug repellent solutions for my dogs and my family. Next thing I know, I have ordered lots of ingredients and am finding myself getting to get into this. My husband said if I start stirring a big black couldron and cackling, he will start worrying. Lol. I told him Eye of Newt doesn’t seem to be available in an EO, so not to worry.
I love lavender and chamomile for their calming and relaxing properties. We too use them a lot. I love making fabric sprays with some vodka, water, and eos and spritzing the sheets and pillows. It doesn’t smell of alcohol and my kids can do it before bed which is fun for them. Plus it dilutes the oils so I don’t have to worry about them being too strong for them. I love that lavender and chamomile are even safe for young babies! Thanks for the tip!
It really depends on the size of your diffuser. The combination, I think is based on your preference, but the total drops should be 6-7 for a 100 – 150 ml water tank, and 8-10 for a 200-350 ml tank. I also have a 750 ml diffuser/vaporizer I haven’t used yet, so I am thinking I would use 15-20 drops in that. I would start on the lighter side, and then increase to the higher recommended amount based on your tolerance. I began using EOs starting with diffusing lavender and a Good Nite blend last summer to help me sleep, as I couldn’t fall asleep and stay asleep. Now I am educating myself in all the benefits, and am slowly becoming addicted.
Humm, I can’t tell you much without seeing the version of the EO you purchased, Valerie, but one reason why they could have said that is that the EO you bought is a cold-pressed orange EO which can cause photosensitivity after sun exposure. Cold-pressed citrus oils are known to do that, as well as a few others. Here’s a great post on this topic. What you can do is use it for flavoring things, cleaning, diffusing, or in your skin care products during the winter months when you won’t get as much sun exposure and purchase a steam-distilled orange EO to use during the summer months. Hope this helps!
Hi – My family and I have been using essential oils for 10 years. We are 100% believers in their healing powers. I turned essential oils into a business about 4 years ago, due to my first hand knowledge of their amazing properties. To address some of the diffuser comments and questions above, you do not need a nebulizing diffuser to enjoy the benefits of oils. Ultrasonic diffusers that use water do an excellent job of transporting oils in the air. And, though nebulizers provide an intense essential oil experience, they take a lot of oil to run and they run through that oil quickly. Now, if you’re water source is compromised, this can degrade the oil. We have, however, made a push to provide all types of diffuser options to our customers. If you don’t like plastic diffusers, we have ceramic. If you don’t want ceramic, we have glass. If you don’t want ultrasonic with water, we have nebulizing diffusers. If anyone has any questions, please reach out. We’ve been using oils daily, for a long time. Happy to answer any question or address concerns the best I can. Thanks
I believe your comment on this post about diffuser recipes said, “doTERRA oils are overpriced” or something along those lines. As someone who is deeply involved with doTERRA, knows what goes into doTERRA oils, has been to the fields where the plants are grown and met the farmers, and also compared doTERRA oils to a number of other brands, I wholeheartedly disagree with your comment. I believe doTERRA oils are an amazing value.
Sign up below to download a PDF with 24 essential oils and the various ways they can be used… including oils in all eight blending categories! Once you sign up, you’ll get the download link in your inbox shortly as well as your special gift from Plant Therapy (one of my favorite essential oil companies)! Be sure to save the file to your computer for safekeeping, and print a copy out for quick access too!

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I believe sandalwood is a base not Annette. Of course you can combine whatever you like together if you think it smells good. I don’t think there are any black and white rules when it comes to blending as long as you have something from each note so your blend is “well rounded”. And from my understanding categories and notes are all relative to the other oils you’re referencing… they too are not black and white. Hope that helps some!

I love lavender and chamomile for their calming and relaxing properties. We too use them a lot. I love making fabric sprays with some vodka, water, and eos and spritzing the sheets and pillows. It doesn’t smell of alcohol and my kids can do it before bed which is fun for them. Plus it dilutes the oils so I don’t have to worry about them being too strong for them. I love that lavender and chamomile are even safe for young babies! Thanks for the tip!
CITRUS. Similar to sandalwood, this is a group of scents that can be stimulating or sleep-promoting, depending on your individual reaction and the type of citrus oil used. Bergamot, a type of orange, has been shown to relieve anxiety and improve sleep quality. Lemon oil has demonstrated anxiety and depression-relieving effects in research. Citrus may help some people fall asleep more easily, while others may find these fresh, bright scents are relaxing, but not sleep-promoting. If citrus scents are stimulating to you, don’t use them before bed—but do consider using them during the day, to help you feel both refreshed and relaxed.
Hi there – thanks for a great article, I am just starting out in using essential oils and this has been really helpful. I have just made my first batch up today of blends (Relaxing: lavender, bergamot & rosewood. And insect repellent: lavender, peppermint & rosewood. I don’t have a large stock on EO’s yet so limited to what I can use at the moment). However I am little stumped regarding the dilution rates? In your article you gave a 10% and 20%, are these okay to use on the skin? I read on another page that a 2% dilution should be used on the skin? So more like 1 drop of essential oil blend to 4 tsp of carrier oil. Which is correct please? Also, what dilution rate would you recommend on young children? Thanks 🙂
When it comes to blending essential oils for aromatic purposes (that means you’re blending based on scent rather than a therapeutic action), it’s important to make sure you find essential oil combinations that go together or attract so they smell nice once they’re blended together. I personally find this to be important when blending essential oils for therapeutic purposes as well, but that’s just a personal preference.  
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