Hi, Kelly. The opt-in form is at the very bottom of the post, above the references and author info. If you still don’t see it, it could be a technical issues, and I can sign you up manually with your permission. Just let me know. Update: Hey, Kelly. I’m showing that you’ve been added to the list so you should receive your download link soon. Sorry for the trouble!
Thank you SO MUCH for your information in regards to the so called “therapeutic Essential Oils” I long suspected there was no such thing and it is a Marketing ploy for these two companies in question as well, I have been personally challenged by doTERRA consultants because my Essential oils are much cheaper than theirs, but I purchase Pure essential oils, bottle and resell, I have had no complaints in 17 years, your information has helped me feel much more secure in what I am doing?Kind regards Linda

add water to your diffuser (tip:  be sure to stop filling below the little line inside your diffuser.  Ultrasonic diffusers need to have space at the top so that the water can move back and forth rapidly enough to turn into the cold mist that comes out of the top of the diffuser.  If you fill the water level too high, then you won’t get as much mist out of the diffuser.  Less water (more space at the top) equals more mist.  Too much water (little to no space at the top) equals little to no mist.)
Hello! Loved the article. Very helpful! I just started using oils this past spring and got them through Young Living, however I can’t afford them and found Eden’s Garden is more reasonable for me. My question is can I blend the two brands together? I still have some YL oils left and was just going to replace the ones I’m out of with Eden’s Garden. I usually just diffuse them, but have made a cream for Hand, Foot, Mouth.
Okay, so I am clearly late to the game on this post, but I am so glad I found it! Jill, I have been researching essential oils, diffusers, oil blends, etc. – and my gosh!, there is a lot of information out there. It is overwhelming. Thank you for this very helpful, easy to follow post on using essential oils in a diffuser. I signed up to receive your emails and got your book for FREE. Thank you! My family of four has been so sick this past month. My friends keep telling me that I need to be using essential oils. Your blog is fantastic. I know I will be coming back to visit often. Blessings, Jana
I almost always give my kids baths in the evening (same goes for me) as a way to relax before bed so we use a lot of relaxing oils like lavender and chamomile or grounding oils like patchouli and vetiver. If I give them a bath in the middle of the day for some reason I’ll use more uplifting/energizing oils. Citrus oils mostly, but there are others that work great in those blends too like mint oils. Of course I’m always careful about safety precautions with EOs and using the correct ones with my kids. Best of luck with your bath melts. I’ve never tried those before so I’ll have to put that on my to-do list. They look wonderful!
Like most people I am new to mixing EO’s. First, I would like to say thank you for all your time and hard work you put into this article. Most people don’t realize how much time goes into the trial and error process. It seems you have done a lot of hard work and a good job for us all to take into consideration. I would like to know if you have to rest it 24 hours if you are going to be putting it in an oil burner or a diffuser? I would be mixing something for calming and concentration. I homeschool and my DD needs something to help her stay focused and my patience is being test greatly right now.

find the diffuser blend you want to try – There are 30 fall essential oil diffuser blends to pick from below.  Find the one that suits your mood, find a new one to try, or find one that has the emotional/physical essential oil benefits you need.  If you don’t have a specific essential oil, don’t worry.  Either you can substitute a similar oil or try one of the other 30 recipes.  There are sure to be a few for which you have all the needed oils.

Unofficially medically, I would be classed with high blood pressure and have tested for cholesterol.. Average (HDL) to borderline (LDL) triglycerides are what is out of whack.. So in my beginning stage of understanding and use of EO’s I … Oh inflammation is my worst symptom…with that all being said I have found that I should utilize Helichysum , lemon and ginger oil. All of which deal with inflammation/ HBP.


Hi Cindy. The amount of oils to lotion will depend on what you’re using your lotion for and how often. If it’s an all-over body lotion that’s used a couple times a day you usually use a lower dilution (1-2%), but if it’s a lotion for bug bites or eczema and you’re only putting it on a small area of skin, you can use a higher dilution (3-5%). A 1% dilution is 1 drop of essential oil for every 1 teaspoon of product. Another way to look at it is 6 drops for every 1 ounce. Hope that helps!
One of the things I did for my kids when they were younger and had a hard time going to sleep was put one to two drops of either chamomile or lavender eo in the palm of my hands, rub them together, then rub them all over the kids pillowcase and sheets. It worked like magic! The oils would wear off through the night and by morning the kids were refreshed and in a great mood.
Essential oils for babies should always be diluted using a carrier oil. The carrier oils help ensure the essential oil doesn’t irritate your baby and is more evenly distributed. Just as adults react differently to different essential oils, so do babies, but on the whole they are more sensitive. The National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy recommends a dilution ratio of .5 to 2.5 percent, and avoiding some oils overall.
Unofficially medically, I would be classed with high blood pressure and have tested for cholesterol.. Average (HDL) to borderline (LDL) triglycerides are what is out of whack.. So in my beginning stage of understanding and use of EO’s I … Oh inflammation is my worst symptom…with that all being said I have found that I should utilize Helichysum , lemon and ginger oil. All of which deal with inflammation/ HBP.
One notable benefit of sandalwood essential oil is its natural sleep aid properties. In a recent clinical trial, sandalwood essential oil was noted to have a depressive effect on the central nervous system, which helped promote relaxation and sleep. Sandalwood is one of the most popular essential oils for sleep aid remedies and one of the best essential oils for insomnia.
In the post below and accompanying free printable, you’ll find what I think are the 30 best fall essential oil blends.  I’ve kept my most popular classic recipes and added 15 new fall diffuser recipes-  pumpkin pie, apple orchard, snickerdoodle cookies, sweater weather, orange cinnamon rolls, warm apple pie, evening by the fire, vanilla spice, crisp autumn, flannel, cozy home, and many more.  
Apply to the body directly. Some people find it soothing to apply essential oils to pressure points, like the wrists or behind the ears, or use oils to give themselves a light self-massage. (Massage for–or from–your bed partners work great, too!) Essential oils in undiluted form are highly concentrated and intense, and can irritate your skin. DO NOT APPLY undiluted essential oil to your skin. If you’re planning to use essential oils topically on your body, be sure you’re buying an already diluted oil—a mixture of the fragrant essential oil of your choice and a carrier oil (often a vegetable oil).
Hello. I’m an EO newbie. My children and I this weekend created some blends for their new atomizing diffusers for their rooms. I saw a post that said something about the need to use a carrier oil for diffusing. Is this necessary and/or safe for the machine that I am using? We have just been diffusing with “straight” EO’s and it seems right. Am I causing more harm than good?
VANILLA. The sweet scent of vanilla is appealing to many people, and it has a long history of use for relaxation and stress relief. Vanilla can have sedative effects on the body. It can reduce hyperactivity and restlessness, quiet the nervous system, and lower blood pressure. It also appears to help relieve anxiety and depression, with a combining both relaxation and an uplift in mood. If the smell of cookies baking relaxes and soothes you, vanilla might be a scent to try for sleep—without the calories!
It’s easier to get a better night’s sleep when you have the right mattress. Check out our guide to choosing the best mattress, read unbiased mattress reviews, and find the best mattress for you based on your preferred sleeping position: Best Mattresses for Back Sleepers, Best Mattresses for Side Sleepers, Best Mattresses for Stomach Sleepers, Best Mattresses for Combination Sleepers.
Too bad valerian smells like stinky feet, because it really does the trick when it comes to getting a good nights rest. Valerian has been used in many different ways for centuries to reduce stress, tension and instill a sense of peace and tranquility. You’ll definitely want to mask this scent with a blend. While it is pricey, and a bit of an acquired smell, this is definitely one of the most effective essential oils for insomnia.
Anyone who’s smelled fresh cookies baking in the oven knows that scents have a strong influence on how we feel. When we smell something, our olfactory nerve sends signals directly to our limbic system and amygdala, the parts of our brain responsible for our memory or mood. That’s why certain scents can instantly make us feel brighter, or recall a favorite memory.
Weird question- how can you switch from mix to mix in the same diffuser without having crossover? Is cleaning it out very complicated? And how to inhibit mold growth in the cold air diffuser- is it just a bonus that the EOs are anti bacterial/biotic/fungal or do you have to add some other ingredient? (I did read the article, I just didn’t see it, but it’s almost 1 am, so that may be why, lol)
Multiple studies have found bergamot essential oil both induces the physiological changes that accompany sleep – like reduced heart rate and blood pressure – as well as reduces the thoughts that keep people up at night, like feelings of stress and anxiety. However, bergamot is photosensitive and makes your skin more sensitive to the sun, so topical applications should be avoided before going outside.
I’m a massage therapist and also a user of EOs. I really enjoyed reading this. I found it to be very helpful in understanding EOs and how to blend them by notes and by and by categories. This has been the most in depth I have seen anyone get into usage and blending. I apreciate how positive you are towards all brands of oils. I have bookmarked your page and will be back for more information.
I’ve never used it before, Joan, but I would imagine a little would go a long way and that it would be a great addition to muscle blends! I’d also guess it would fall into the “spicy” category of essential oils, and I would also decrease its total amount in any blend I made it in as it’s probably a very strong oil. I do use cayenne along with some other essential oils in the muscle rub blend that I make for my medicine cabinet. You can find that recipe in my How To Make Herbal Ointments, Salves, and Balms: The Ultimate How-To Guide if you’re interested.
It really depends on the size of your diffuser. The combination, I think is based on your preference, but the total drops should be 6-7 for a 100 – 150 ml water tank, and 8-10 for a 200-350 ml tank. I also have a 750 ml diffuser/vaporizer I haven’t used yet, so I am thinking I would use 15-20 drops in that. I would start on the lighter side, and then increase to the higher recommended amount based on your tolerance. I began using EOs starting with diffusing lavender and a Good Nite blend last summer to help me sleep, as I couldn’t fall asleep and stay asleep. Now I am educating myself in all the benefits, and am slowly becoming addicted.
I believe sandalwood is a base not Annette. Of course you can combine whatever you like together if you think it smells good. I don’t think there are any black and white rules when it comes to blending as long as you have something from each note so your blend is “well rounded”. And from my understanding categories and notes are all relative to the other oils you’re referencing… they too are not black and white. Hope that helps some!
Once you’ve got your base and middle note oils smelling the way you want them, you’ll add in one drop of your top note oil, swirl and smell your blend again, and see what you think. From there, you keep adding oils one drop at a time until you get the a scent you like. Like I said, this blending ratio is a mix between beginner and intermediate blending because you’re only working with three essential oils, but you’re relying on your senses and intuition to guide you.

As far as the testing goes… I don’t know much about it other than I think she did opt for more expensive and more accurate testing the 2nd and 3rd time she had oils tested. I’m not sure on that though. All I know is that her tests got a lot of attention… much of which brought about changes from some of the bigger EO companies so she must have done something right.

I came upon your post while doing a search on essential oils and absolutes. I love your writing style, and overall website design, so that you for this lovely post. Here’s a question for you Do you have experience blending the two? I believe they need an emulifier to make them mix since one is distilled with water and the other via an alcohol process. Any suggestions on a natural emulating agent that will keep these two blended together nicely?
When it comes to essential oils, you get what you pay for. YEs, there are plenty of brands out there than claim to be 100% pure (heck, you can even get “pure” lavender oil from Wal-Mart, which testing results show is not even true lavender oil…), but just because an oil claims to be 100% pure does not mean it is of the same-quality, or contains the same constituents as a properly-sourced oil. doTERRA sources their oils from all over the world and is committed to paying growers and farmers fair wages. Think “fair trade coffee”, but with essential oils instead. In other instances with other companies, oils are often purchased in bulk from middlemen, and they farmers are not paid fairly for their work. A high-quality product priced in a way to support farmers to produce the highest-quality oils as possible (many in third-world countries) is not the same as a company “greedy for money”.
I am sorry if this is offending, but why does DoTerra price their oils so high? I will never buy from them because I have used them and they are the same quality as all the other brands not greedy for money. For example: I can buy 100% pure (and I have this to compared to other brands, still work the best) Frankincense oil for about $14 for 4oz. But if I got DoTerra, that would cost me a hefty $558 wholesale. DoTerra retail for that would be even more, $744. That is 53x the price of the same quality oil I get. So is DoTerra really 53x better that what I get?
Many essential oils are adaptogens, which means they adapt to the person taking them and have different effects on different people. For instance, vetiver oil relieves insomnia for some people, while creating a feeling of refreshment and alertness for others during times of exhaustion. Of course, some oils are known precisely for their activating effects, like energizing tangerine or lemongrass, and should be avoided as a sleep aid.

I really enjoyed this post and then I read you’re bio at the end and I liked it even more. I’m about 5 years late in reading it but better late than never. I am new to blending and have been reading whatever I can about techniques and I think your input has really helped me embrace the fact that this is as much of an art as it is a science and although there is a lot of chemistry involved, intuition and patience play a big role in it too. It’s really helped me prioritize what I want to accomplish and this article even helped make blending a little less intimidating/overwhelming. Thank you again for your help and God bless!!
I started my journey with essential oils about 2 years ago after the birth of my first child. To say that they changed my life forever would be an understatement. I have created a book called "The Ultimate Beginners Guide to Essential Oils" that will teach you about some of the amazing benefits and uses that essential oils can provide in your home. Click here to get the FREE book.
Hello! I love this article. So helpful. I am blending some oils for diffusers and used this article to help me formulate a blend to promote clear breathing. It has lemongrass, rosemary, eucaliptus and incense. I used your suggested ratios for top and bottom notes and it smells lovely. But something weird happens! The smell kind of disappears after you first smell it. It’s almost as if this particular blend kind of blocks the olfactory nerves or something, because after the first smell I can hardly smell it at all. My husband and friend tested it for me and something similar happens to them. Do you have any ideas why this might happen? At first I thought I made the blend too weak, but then I realized that the first sniff was great and after that it receded to nothing. Any thoughts?
Love the listening course and the routine card printables and listening workbook so far. Listening has been our biggest challenge lately. My son was flat out just ignoring our voices. I started implementing the strategies yesterday and it was such smooth sailing all day long. Not only that, but the empathy statements and “turning a no into a yes” actually had my three year old saying “okay, mom” happily and complying right away without fighting or tears, by the end of the day! And it has worked wonders for my mood and frustration level when the arguing and tears are not averted. Trying to keep the 5:1 ratio has made me realize what a bad habit I’d fallen into. It becomes so easy to give commands and warnings and issue no’s, that you forget to take notice of the good! I feel so much better, as a mom, now that I’m intentionally encouraging my kid for his strengths. Thank you so much!
LAVENDER. This is the most popular essential oil for sleep and relaxation among my patients, and my first, general go-to recommendation for people looking to try aromatherapy for sleep. Lavender is a soothing scent that’s long been associated with relaxation and sleep, and used as a natural remedy for anxiety. Lavender is probably the most rigorously studied essential oil. A robust body of research shows lavender has anxiety reducing—or anxiolytic—effects, as well as beneficial effects on depression. Lavender can also help with pain relief, several studies show. One recent study showed aromatherapy using lavender oil reduced the need for pain medications in a group of 6 to 12-year-old children recovering from having their tonsils removed. Lavender also has sedative effects, meaning it can work directly to help you fall asleep. A number of studies point to lavender’s effectiveness for sleep: improving sleep quality, increasing sleep amounts, and elevating daytime alertness, including in people with insomnia.
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Thank you so much for all this awesome information regarding oils and their uses as well as how to blend. Since I starting using oils, I cannot imagine my life now without them. I have been on antidepressants on and off for a big part of my life. Now with my oils, I no longer need them. Anyway, thanks again, I use your page as one of my biggest “go to” resources for my oil questions. Have a great day!

Many people prefer to use essential oils because they’re natural and don’t create the common side effects associated with many sleep medications, such as daytime drowsiness or more serious health risks. For example, a 2010 study found smelling jasmine to be just as effective at calming the nerves as a sleeping pill or sedative, but without any adverse side effects.


Hi Diana. It sounds like you’re mixing carrier oils together which are totally fine and very good at nourishing the skin on their own. What I’m talking about here in this post is how to blend essential oil together to get a nice smell. This essential oil blend will then be added to the carrier oil(s) of your choice like those you mentioned in your comment. If you wanna learn more about blending essential oils based on their therapeutic properties and have them smell good too, check out this post I wrote on how to create therapeutic essential oil blends in 7 steps. Hope this helps some! Thanks for your comment!
Hi Cari. I don’t have much experience with different types of EO diffusers. I have a Young Living diffuser that my MIL bought me, and I love it. I use it often and it works great. It’s pricy, but totally worth it to have one in my opinion. However, I have heard others say that the cheaper ones work just as well. I know Plant Therapy carries diffusers, and I think they have some really great ones that are lower priced. Hope that helps!

For sleep: A body of research shows that essential oils can provide relief for disrupted sleep and improve sleep quality in adults. A 2017 study compared the effects of aromatherapy and acupressure massage on sleep quality and overall quality of life in women. Researchers found that a blend of sleep-promoting essential oils worked more effectively to improve both sleep quality and quality of life than acupressure. The blended oil was also more effective at improving sleep than a single essential oil, lavender.


When creating essential oil blends, the ratio I almost always follow is what I call the “30-50-20 Rule.” This is an essential oil blending ratio where you use 30% of your top note oil, 50% of your middle note oil, and 20% of your base note oil in your blend. This blending ratio consists of 10 total drops of essential oils, totaling 100% once combined.
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