[…] If you can make your cramped studio apartment feel more like a spa, why wouldn’t you? While some scents may help promote relaxation and sleep, other essential oils can help you start your day feeling more energized.  Try diffusing citrus, peppermint, rosemary, or eucalyptus oils to help you wake up in the morning. Or if you want to get a little crazy, try mixing it up with an essential oil recipe like one of these. […]
This is so perfect. I have been studying so much on herbs and oils. I make my own herbal tea blends that I sell. I just finished mixing the oils for a calming aromatherapy oil. I used a 1oz bottle. I kind of go big or go home… And this is my first go at it. It has lavender, majorim, orange sweet, and sandlewood. They are “resting” now. I like to use oil like this before bed. So I decided to try my own mixture with what I have learned and my favorite and most soothing smells. I will then mix the rest with my carrier oil and have my first ounce of a blend. But it’s just for me. If it turns out well… I may make roll on scents to sell in my shop!
Okay, so I am clearly late to the game on this post, but I am so glad I found it! Jill, I have been researching essential oils, diffusers, oil blends, etc. – and my gosh!, there is a lot of information out there. It is overwhelming. Thank you for this very helpful, easy to follow post on using essential oils in a diffuser. I signed up to receive your emails and got your book for FREE. Thank you! My family of four has been so sick this past month. My friends keep telling me that I need to be using essential oils. Your blog is fantastic. I know I will be coming back to visit often. Blessings, Jana
Using Leslie’s list as an example, several of the oils on her list are known to be phototoxic, but since she’s not applying her blend to her skin in any way, she doesn’t have to worry about that so much. Instead, she’s more concerned with some of the oils being irritating the the mucous membranes as she will be diffusing this recipe so she decides to diffuse her blend for short periods of time only to minimize this possibility.

They make jewelry now that can hold oils…like lava stones, which you can put a few drops right on…and, several different types, depending on how many stones…..or a necklace that holds stones, or a little piece of felt, or a little cloth ball. The jewelry has a spot that opens and closes, so you can add whichever method, and scent you choose. My son wears a lava stone bracelet for his anxiety, and then some veviter to help his ADD. I have several pieces that I use for myself. Google them, or look on Ebay or Amazon.
Well, they may be the same type of essential oil, but quality can be different among companies. Now I’m not one to jump on the bandwagon of one brand over another, but the reason I listed the YL and doTERRA as internal and the others as external is because that’s how they market their products… not because I say it’s okay or even use them that way. As I said in the post, I don’t use EOs internally… I’ve never needed to, but if I were going to, I’d probably go with one of these two brands over some of the other ones. If you wanna see comparisons of EO brands, check out Lea Harris’ site – Learning About EOs – she has testing done of many of the major brands and compares them to each other. It’s very interested when you are concerned about quality. Hope that answers your question… thank you!
Hey, Rachel. It looks like you may have too many top note EOs in your blend which is why you’re not getting that long-lasting scent from it. Rosemary is the only oil you listed that is a middle note, but it’s also considered a bit of a top note too. In all the blending formulas, the middle notes make up the largest portion of your blend with top notes coming in second and base notes coming in last as they mainly ground or stabalize your blend. If I were you, I would go through the process again, adding in more middle note oils and maybe taking out some top note oils. Or, you could always find some middle note oils that fit with the purpose of your blend and blend well with the oils you’re already using. In that case, all you’d need to do would be to adjust the amounts of each oil in the final blend (using the suggested formulas) so that your middle note oils make up the largest portion of the blend. Hope that helps! PS… There are also some essential oils that stimulate nerves that allow you to smell them once and then you can no longer smell them until the nerves are destimulated. I can’t remember which exact EOs that do that, but I read about it from an aromatherapist a while back. I’ve not looked into it much, but I thought that was interesting.

HELP I’m actually planning on making some home heat pads with jasmine rice. My plan was to use dried lavender and rosemary. I saw oils and a fixative would help the scent last in the herbs. So, making a “perfume blend” with lavender as my strongest scent, then rosemary, and oakmoss absolute as my fixative. I was going to put the rosemary and lavender buds in separate bowls with the majority of the rice in the lavender but a smaller portion set with the rosemary…then add a few drops of the essential oils to the separate bowls (rosemary probably 4-6) (lavender 8-12). After they’ve dried I’d like to combine everything and add my oak moss absolute … I want 2-3 drops I just have no idea how to help that spread TBH but this IS my plan-really hoping if you have any advice or experience about my plans to please share before I ruin everything lol THANK YOU!


You could try using equal amounts of each and see how it turns out for you. The problem I find with that is that the stronger scents will tend to overpower the lighter scents because too much was used. For example if you were to blend lavender and patchouli and you used equal amounts, your blend is probably not going to smell as good as if you used more lavender than patchouli because patchouli is very strong and it can smell bad if too much is used.
I’ve used YL oils only a few times whereas I’ve used EG oils much, much more, and honestly I’ve not noticed much of a difference. Maybe it’s because I wasn’t paying attention though. I think YL has great products… their seed to seal promise is reassuring, but I don’t think they’re the “best” or “only” EO company out there. I’ve been very happy with EG oils. I’ve recently tried Plant Therapy oils, and I’m really happy with those. I have a Q&A with that company coming ups soon so stay tuned as it will give you more info on them. All this goes to say, I’d personally try some other EO brands like Plant Therapy or Mountain Rose Herbs before I’d pay the high prices and commit myself to YL. If I wasn’t happy with any of the others companies or oils, then I’d go for YL. We each like different things and there’s really no “wrong” brand. Do what works for you and you feel is best. Everyone is welcome here. I’m not committed to one company. I just what has worked best for me. Currently it’s EG, but that could change as I find other companies I like. I hope this answers your question Jessica and is helpful to you!
I’m so so sorry Diana, but I’m definitely not a perfumist. That blend sounds awesome… like something I’d definitely wear, but I’m no help. This article is a basis how to on how to blend… I don’t know enough about the smells of individual oils to be able to tell you what you’re missing and how much of each oil to use. You’ll just have to experiment and see or consult with someone who makes essential oil perfumes. Thanks!
Investing in an essential oil diffuser is a great first step to filling your room with sleeping-inducing aromas, and there are so many affordable options that will be the perfect vessel for all of your sleepy-time blends. Once you have your diffuser all set up alongside your bed, you'll want to figure out which essential oils combine well to relax your body and calm your mind, so that you'll be able to enjoy a peaceful slumber every single night.
Most commonly, essential oils are used in an essential diffuser together with water. Aromatherapy works quite well over our olfactory system (=sense of smell) as many emotions can be triggered by certain cents alone. While there are other ways to use essential oils, diffuser blending is a fun art and hobby on its own that many essential oil enthusiasts enjoy.
Thank you a million times for this post. My son turned 2 in December. I have not had a full night’s sleep since he was born. I was becoming very desperate. I read this post and decided to give it a go. I combine Cedarwood, frankincense and ylang ylang in my diffuser. My son still sleeps in our bed most nights, but at least now we all get a full 8 hours. Thank you again!
Hi there – thanks for a great article, I am just starting out in using essential oils and this has been really helpful. I have just made my first batch up today of blends (Relaxing: lavender, bergamot & rosewood. And insect repellent: lavender, peppermint & rosewood. I don’t have a large stock on EO’s yet so limited to what I can use at the moment). However I am little stumped regarding the dilution rates? In your article you gave a 10% and 20%, are these okay to use on the skin? I read on another page that a 2% dilution should be used on the skin? So more like 1 drop of essential oil blend to 4 tsp of carrier oil. Which is correct please? Also, what dilution rate would you recommend on young children? Thanks 🙂
Love the listening course and the routine card printables and listening workbook so far. Listening has been our biggest challenge lately. My son was flat out just ignoring our voices. I started implementing the strategies yesterday and it was such smooth sailing all day long. Not only that, but the empathy statements and “turning a no into a yes” actually had my three year old saying “okay, mom” happily and complying right away without fighting or tears, by the end of the day! And it has worked wonders for my mood and frustration level when the arguing and tears are not averted. Trying to keep the 5:1 ratio has made me realize what a bad habit I’d fallen into. It becomes so easy to give commands and warnings and issue no’s, that you forget to take notice of the good! I feel so much better, as a mom, now that I’m intentionally encouraging my kid for his strengths. Thank you so much!

It really depends on the size of your diffuser. The combination, I think is based on your preference, but the total drops should be 6-7 for a 100 – 150 ml water tank, and 8-10 for a 200-350 ml tank. I also have a 750 ml diffuser/vaporizer I haven’t used yet, so I am thinking I would use 15-20 drops in that. I would start on the lighter side, and then increase to the higher recommended amount based on your tolerance. I began using EOs starting with diffusing lavender and a Good Nite blend last summer to help me sleep, as I couldn’t fall asleep and stay asleep. Now I am educating myself in all the benefits, and am slowly becoming addicted.
Hey Shelley! Good for you for starting to add EOs to your soaps. I love scented, homemade soaps! As for what oils to mix with the ones you already have, let me direct you back to the post on blending. It will help you find other EOs to add to the ones you have and to come up with blends that work for your soaps. Figure out what categories and notes the oils you have are and then work on finding other oils that complement them. It’s hands on. You have to get oils and try out different blends and decide on what YOU like. Lastly, “apple” is not an essential oil… it’s a fragrance oil and it isn’t considered natural. If you’re going for “all natural” soaps and scents you may want to rethink that one. You could replace it with chamomile as many people think chamomile has an apple-like scent. You’ll need to decide if Roman chamomile or German Chamomile is better. Thanks for your comment, and I hope this has helped you some.
Hi – My family and I have been using essential oils for 10 years. We are 100% believers in their healing powers. I turned essential oils into a business about 4 years ago, due to my first hand knowledge of their amazing properties. To address some of the diffuser comments and questions above, you do not need a nebulizing diffuser to enjoy the benefits of oils. Ultrasonic diffusers that use water do an excellent job of transporting oils in the air. And, though nebulizers provide an intense essential oil experience, they take a lot of oil to run and they run through that oil quickly. Now, if you’re water source is compromised, this can degrade the oil. We have, however, made a push to provide all types of diffuser options to our customers. If you don’t like plastic diffusers, we have ceramic. If you don’t want ceramic, we have glass. If you don’t want ultrasonic with water, we have nebulizing diffusers. If anyone has any questions, please reach out. We’ve been using oils daily, for a long time. Happy to answer any question or address concerns the best I can. Thanks

The other brands, while cheap, seem really watered down and have very “off” aromas. It worries me to use them because I suspect there are some solvents or chemicals used. They do not claim therapeutic grade. One bottle of Rocky Mountain’s immune boosting blend only lasted me a week when diffusing it, but a bottle of doTERRA’s comparable blend, OnGuard, lasted me several months. The difference in price can seem dramatic, but when you have to use 10 drops of one oil to get the same effects of 1 drop of another… they even out.
If we could spend each day of the week swimming in the ocean, boating on a lake, or twirling in the rain, we would! There’s nothing that smells more amazing than the seaside or a summer storm, and each of these blends will remind you of your treasured aqua adventures. Grab your trusty diffuser, add some YL essential oils, and press “go” on crashing waves and swimming pool cannon balls!

Hi there! I’m new (well several months in, but “new” in the grand scheme of things) to the world of EO’S but have learned a lot along the way. Thank you for writing about making blends; I hope to whip some up once I add a couple more EO’s to my stash. I did feel compelled to write & express my concern towards your “10 Must Have..” chart. I don’t know about all of the oils, but I do know that peppermint and eucalyptus especially are no-no’s for young children (eucalyptus can cause respiratory issues). And since there are several varieties of eucalyptus out there varying in strength, a parent could mistakenly purchase & use the strongest one on a too-young child! I do hope that this is taken in the manner it is written, with caring & concern!!
One of the things I did for my kids when they were younger and had a hard time going to sleep was put one to two drops of either chamomile or lavender eo in the palm of my hands, rub them together, then rub them all over the kids pillowcase and sheets. It worked like magic! The oils would wear off through the night and by morning the kids were refreshed and in a great mood.
find the diffuser blend you want to try – There are 30 fall essential oil diffuser blends to pick from below.  Find the one that suits your mood, find a new one to try, or find one that has the emotional/physical essential oil benefits you need.  If you don’t have a specific essential oil, don’t worry.  Either you can substitute a similar oil or try one of the other 30 recipes.  There are sure to be a few for which you have all the needed oils.
When you start your diffuser blend, please start conservatively. A small amount of essential oil can produce a significant aroma. Be careful to not overload the diffuser blend right when you start pouring your first drops into it. Sometimes, the essential oil bottle droppers release the oils quite quickly. Start with a low pouring angle so the oil drops don’t come out too quickly for you, and you can accurately stop the flow after 1-2 drops.
Word of Caution: The use of essential oils for sleep problems is very popular, but it is important to consider the side effects that some of these oils may have. They are packed with active compounds and chemicals that could negatively interact with medications, exacerbate health conditions, irritate the skin, disturb the stomach, cause blood pressure to drop dangerously low, or leave you feeling fatigued or sluggish. Each oil has individual components and risks, so additional research is necessary before you add one to your daily health regimen. Furthermore, you should always discuss your personal risks before using one of these potent essential oils for sleep.
The other brands, while cheap, seem really watered down and have very “off” aromas. It worries me to use them because I suspect there are some solvents or chemicals used. They do not claim therapeutic grade. One bottle of Rocky Mountain’s immune boosting blend only lasted me a week when diffusing it, but a bottle of doTERRA’s comparable blend, OnGuard, lasted me several months. The difference in price can seem dramatic, but when you have to use 10 drops of one oil to get the same effects of 1 drop of another… they even out.

The only reason I say to use limited drops in this article is so you don’t waste your oils as you’re experimenting on what blends you like. Once you have a good sample blend for your air freshener and you like it, you can make more of the blend in a larger amount. So your 3 drops becomes 30 drops, your 5 drops becomes 50 drops and your 2 drops becomes 20 drops and so on. Once you have your blend… you are still going to need to dilute it in your carrier oil of choice.
Word of Caution: The use of essential oils for sleep problems is very popular, but it is important to consider the side effects that some of these oils may have. They are packed with active compounds and chemicals that could negatively interact with medications, exacerbate health conditions, irritate the skin, disturb the stomach, cause blood pressure to drop dangerously low, or leave you feeling fatigued or sluggish. Each oil has individual components and risks, so additional research is necessary before you add one to your daily health regimen. Furthermore, you should always discuss your personal risks before using one of these potent essential oils for sleep.

Please note: Products mentioned in this article have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products and information on this page are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This website is not a substitute for professional care.  Always consult your medical doctor regarding your medical care. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.
Glad to hear you’re finding the info helpful. I’ve never heard of the Majestic Pure brand before so I can’t comment on how strong it is. I always look for EOs from brands I know and trust that are high-quality, pure oils. If you can’t smell your blend well once it’s added to your alcohol, it could be that your dilution rate is off. I’m not sure. If you’re looking for a good company with a lot of oil choices, be sure to check out Edens Garden essential oils. They offer pure EOs, and they carry a ton of scents!
I really enjoy Lea’s website too! One thing I recently learned about the 3rd party testing she had done though, was it may not be very reliable. She chose a chemist in France who used outdated testing equipment simply because it was the cheapest. And although I greatly appreciate her knowledge, she gets very defensive and on the verge of rude at times in the comments. I also know she doesn’t appreciate learning that isn’t taught by a certified aroma therapist.
A stroll through the orchard picking apples is the perfect way to spend a fall afternoon.  When a fall breeze blows through the trees at the orchard near us, it smells very much like this diffuser blend – woody, a little sweet, with a hint of fresh fir from the Christmas tree farm next door.  It’s relaxing and grounding- a great fall diffuser blend to help lessen anxious feelings.
There are several benefits of lavender essential oil including its sedative, anti-anxiety and stress reducing properties. Several studies have indicated that using lavender essential oil for sleep may help slow down the central nervous system activity. The resulting calming effect may cause a person to have better quality of sleep, reduced anxiety and improve overall mood.
Please note: Products mentioned in this article have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products and information on this page are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This website is not a substitute for professional care.  Always consult your medical doctor regarding your medical care. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.
Because vetiver essential oil is distilled from the roots of the plant, it smells very rich and earthy. This is another great oil to try for sleep because it is psychologically grounding, calming and stabilizing. It can take you awhile to get used to the smell, so if you are a vetiver newbie, you can try mixing it with a floral or citrus oil, such as lavender or bergamot.
What most don’t know is that even the labeled 100% pure are not always what they seem and it’s not the companies fault it’s just not available for the regular oil trader. For example, a Sandalwood tree can only produce the oil after the tree has reached it’s 30 year maturity, and since this is such a necessity to India it is only “doled” out to the consumer as a partially pure oil. India has no regulations about the purity they are distributing, so unless you are paying almost $30 an oz. it’s most likely not truly pure, this is the same for absolutes. Absolutes are 100% pure, and they are most expensive and usually very thick.

I believe sandalwood is a base not Annette. Of course you can combine whatever you like together if you think it smells good. I don’t think there are any black and white rules when it comes to blending as long as you have something from each note so your blend is “well rounded”. And from my understanding categories and notes are all relative to the other oils you’re referencing… they too are not black and white. Hope that helps some!
Hi – I recently read that lemon is a great oil for focus in children. I also read that it pairs well with rosemary. I want to make a roller-bottle for my son to take to school. I am not really sure how to mix it. How many drops would you suggest of each and do I need to include a carrier oil? I am super new at this and the internet information and books are overwhelming. Thanks in advance.

I’ve heard some really good things about CBD oil. I haven’t studied it enough to have an opinion, but it looks promising. As far as using essential oils for your autism goes, I’d suggest talking with a clinical aromatherapist as they’ll be the best person to help you identify the right oils to help you move in the direction you want to go. Best of luck, and thanks for your comment!
I’m happy to say that the decision to create signature scents for my products (along with updating my branding and taking new photos) completely changed my business. I was invited to some pretty prestigious Etsy teams, my products were featured on Etsy’s front page over and over again, sales were coming in daily, I had repeat customers who were not only buying my products for themselves but as gifts too, and I had wholesale accounts and blog features… all because I made some simple, small changes to my products.
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