I believe sandalwood is a base not Annette. Of course you can combine whatever you like together if you think it smells good. I don’t think there are any black and white rules when it comes to blending as long as you have something from each note so your blend is “well rounded”. And from my understanding categories and notes are all relative to the other oils you’re referencing… they too are not black and white. Hope that helps some!
They make jewelry now that can hold oils…like lava stones, which you can put a few drops right on…and, several different types, depending on how many stones…..or a necklace that holds stones, or a little piece of felt, or a little cloth ball. The jewelry has a spot that opens and closes, so you can add whichever method, and scent you choose. My son wears a lava stone bracelet for his anxiety, and then some veviter to help his ADD. I have several pieces that I use for myself. Google them, or look on Ebay or Amazon.
Topical application of essential oils can be especially beneficial, since the oils will actually permeate your skin due to their transdermal properties. As a result, not only will you smell them through your olfactory nerve, but they’ll also enter your bloodstream more quickly. However, if you have sensitive skin or allergies, you should avoid applying topically altogether, or otherwise diffuse the oil with a carrier oil such as organic coconut oil, grapeseed oil, or olive oil.
The other brands, while cheap, seem really watered down and have very “off” aromas. It worries me to use them because I suspect there are some solvents or chemicals used. They do not claim therapeutic grade. One bottle of Rocky Mountain’s immune boosting blend only lasted me a week when diffusing it, but a bottle of doTERRA’s comparable blend, OnGuard, lasted me several months. The difference in price can seem dramatic, but when you have to use 10 drops of one oil to get the same effects of 1 drop of another… they even out.

You’re totally right… I’m not a certified aromatherapist therefore I don’t treat or consult with people on EO use. However, I do share good info I’ve learned and a few recipes here and there. But, like you said, there’s good info out there to be learned, and I think it’s important for people to take the info (mine included) and go check it out with research of their own. There are people who are smart and self-taught in certain areas, but that doesn’t mean they’re perfect… we all need to double check things, you know.

[…] If you can make your cramped studio apartment feel more like a spa, why wouldn’t you? While some scents may help promote relaxation and sleep, other essential oils can help you start your day feeling more energized.  Try diffusing citrus, peppermint, rosemary, or eucalyptus oils to help you wake up in the morning. Or if you want to get a little crazy, try mixing it up with an essential oil recipe like one of these. […]

I don’t care about money, I do want to get off disability though now that I have 16 hours of free time a day and am not stuck in a bed taking pills all day. I want quality though, and to be happy with everything regardless if I ever sold it, I want to give it away for free! I want to grow CBD and give it away. All of this can heal the entire World, that’s why they removed certain things and put synthetics with patents, never even asking us about our diet or exercise, they never cared. I’ve been marketed to my entire life for medicine I’m going to give it all away I think. Or earn the money and then donate it. I just don’t like money, it’s dangerous.
Asking these questions can help you to know whether you’re finding accurate information that you can trust or not. There are plenty of websites out there dedicated to teaching others about essential oils and aromatherapy whether it’s a school for essential oil studies, a company that sells essential oils, or a blogger who loves to share what she’s learning about them (and references her sources!).

One notable benefit of sandalwood essential oil is its natural sleep aid properties. In a recent clinical trial, sandalwood essential oil was noted to have a depressive effect on the central nervous system, which helped promote relaxation and sleep. Sandalwood is one of the most popular essential oils for sleep aid remedies and one of the best essential oils for insomnia.
I posted a reply comment regarding the price of essential oils stating that in most cases you do get what you pay for but some companies are overpriced. This was obviously a comment that you did not want read and felt threatened by the content. Obviously your philosophy is based financially and not in the best interest of what is good for the consumer. Shame on you!
If it were me EYG, I’d Google “safe essential oils for dogs” and get a list to go by. Then I’d Google “bug repelling essential oils” and compare the two lists. Cross off any EOs on the bug repellant list that aren’t safe for dogs. Next, I’d put the oils you have left into their notes and categories and try to find 3-4 bug repelling oils that can be paired together and still smell nice and well-rounded. You can combine these EOs together using the percentage rule mentioned in the post and label it with “bug repellant EOs for dog”. When you’re ready to use it, mix it into your carrier oil at the appropriate dilution and you should be good to go. Hope that helps!
Multiple studies have found bergamot essential oil both induces the physiological changes that accompany sleep – like reduced heart rate and blood pressure – as well as reduces the thoughts that keep people up at night, like feelings of stress and anxiety. However, bergamot is photosensitive and makes your skin more sensitive to the sun, so topical applications should be avoided before going outside.
JASMINE. A sweetly floral scent, jasmine appears to have serious sleep-promoting capabilities. Research shows jasmine improves sleep quality and cuts down on restless sleeping, as well as increasing daytime alertness. A 2002 study showed that jasmine delivered all of these sleep benefits, as well as lowering anxiety, even more effectively than lavender.
What would your recommendation be when making blends not for scent but for therapeutic use such as in skincare? I want to try adding essential oils to my skin care routine, specifically adding them to a basic, existing lotion. I’ve done my research and have a bunch of oils selected that are supposed to be helpful for skin care, but I’m not sure where to go from here! Do I figure out the dilution % for each one and add it to the lotion? Or do I need to only add a maximum amount of essential oils in total? Is there a maximum number of oils you can use at one time or a maximum percentage of oils in total that can be safely added? Are there oils that react badly to each other? Sorry so many questions, but I’ve been searching a lot and can’t seem to find any answers!
Wonderful blog site! I just jumped into this EO stuff this week, with little forethought. I wanted some natural bug repellent solutions for my dogs and my family. Next thing I know, I have ordered lots of ingredients and am finding myself getting to get into this. My husband said if I start stirring a big black couldron and cackling, he will start worrying. Lol. I told him Eye of Newt doesn’t seem to be available in an EO, so not to worry.
Hi Cindy. The amount of oils to lotion will depend on what you’re using your lotion for and how often. If it’s an all-over body lotion that’s used a couple times a day you usually use a lower dilution (1-2%), but if it’s a lotion for bug bites or eczema and you’re only putting it on a small area of skin, you can use a higher dilution (3-5%). A 1% dilution is 1 drop of essential oil for every 1 teaspoon of product. Another way to look at it is 6 drops for every 1 ounce. Hope that helps!
Hello I just recently got a divorce. And for a couple weeks could not sleep so the dr. put me on sleeping medicine I do not want to be on them and I was wondering if you could tell me what would be the best essential oils that I could use for falling asleep I use a necklace infuser. By using that would that work or should I apply to the body like you have said in this site. I use lemon oil for depression. What would you have me used to sleep thank you so much for your helping and I really appreciate your time and knowledge on helping me learn thank you.
Well, they may be the same type of essential oil, but quality can be different among companies. Now I’m not one to jump on the bandwagon of one brand over another, but the reason I listed the YL and doTERRA as internal and the others as external is because that’s how they market their products… not because I say it’s okay or even use them that way. As I said in the post, I don’t use EOs internally… I’ve never needed to, but if I were going to, I’d probably go with one of these two brands over some of the other ones. If you wanna see comparisons of EO brands, check out Lea Harris’ site – Learning About EOs – she has testing done of many of the major brands and compares them to each other. It’s very interested when you are concerned about quality. Hope that answers your question… thank you!

They make jewelry now that can hold oils…like lava stones, which you can put a few drops right on…and, several different types, depending on how many stones…..or a necklace that holds stones, or a little piece of felt, or a little cloth ball. The jewelry has a spot that opens and closes, so you can add whichever method, and scent you choose. My son wears a lava stone bracelet for his anxiety, and then some veviter to help his ADD. I have several pieces that I use for myself. Google them, or look on Ebay or Amazon.
I could be wrong, but I think Danika is confusing the term therapeutic grade with the “100% Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade” that doTERRA coined and uses. Some oils are labeled for aromatherapy only, and others state they are therapeutic grade which I imagine is to indicate they are also for medicinal purposes. Not referring to ingestion, but topical applications.

Clary sage is one of the most relaxing, internally balancing, and soothing essential oils out there, and it will provide a potent and soothing aroma to your bedroom throughout the night. Combined with the floral scent of ylang ylang and the earthy musk of sandalwood, you'll be sleeping soundly the minute you cuddle up with your favorite fuzzy blanket.
You’re totally right… I’m not a certified aromatherapist therefore I don’t treat or consult with people on EO use. However, I do share good info I’ve learned and a few recipes here and there. But, like you said, there’s good info out there to be learned, and I think it’s important for people to take the info (mine included) and go check it out with research of their own. There are people who are smart and self-taught in certain areas, but that doesn’t mean they’re perfect… we all need to double check things, you know.

Please note: Products mentioned in this article have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products and information on this page are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This website is not a substitute for professional care.  Always consult your medical doctor regarding your medical care. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.
When it comes to essential oils, you get what you pay for. YEs, there are plenty of brands out there than claim to be 100% pure (heck, you can even get “pure” lavender oil from Wal-Mart, which testing results show is not even true lavender oil…), but just because an oil claims to be 100% pure does not mean it is of the same-quality, or contains the same constituents as a properly-sourced oil. doTERRA sources their oils from all over the world and is committed to paying growers and farmers fair wages. Think “fair trade coffee”, but with essential oils instead. In other instances with other companies, oils are often purchased in bulk from middlemen, and they farmers are not paid fairly for their work. A high-quality product priced in a way to support farmers to produce the highest-quality oils as possible (many in third-world countries) is not the same as a company “greedy for money”.
In the post below and accompanying free printable, you’ll find what I think are the 30 best fall essential oil blends.  I’ve kept my most popular classic recipes and added 15 new fall diffuser recipes-  pumpkin pie, apple orchard, snickerdoodle cookies, sweater weather, orange cinnamon rolls, warm apple pie, evening by the fire, vanilla spice, crisp autumn, flannel, cozy home, and many more.  
The only reason I say to use limited drops in this article is so you don’t waste your oils as you’re experimenting on what blends you like. Once you have a good sample blend for your air freshener and you like it, you can make more of the blend in a larger amount. So your 3 drops becomes 30 drops, your 5 drops becomes 50 drops and your 2 drops becomes 20 drops and so on. Once you have your blend… you are still going to need to dilute it in your carrier oil of choice.
hi meagan – thanks for your post – i have a lot to read and learn on mixing blends for essential oils – i am having so much trouble because i make CP soap – and so many essential oils can disappear during the saponification process – i have managed a couple of blends but they are masculine in perfume – i so want to find an easy blend of no more than 3 oils that will be feminine and for some reason conjure up the seep south and scarlett – i dont live anywhere near there or even in that country but i have a perfume in my head that i just cant for the life of me create. Is there any chance you could point me in the right direction???

From my understanding and research (and I’m not an aromatherapist), all essential oils have particular qualities of smell as far as which are smelled first and which last a short while vs. a long while. This is why you blend them together based on those qualities (which are categorized as “notes”) so you can smell each oil among the others and have your blend last longer. Do you have to follow that rule? Of course not. If you’re making blends that are going to smell great and last a good while, should you follow that rule? Probably… I don’t know for sure as I’m not an aromatherapist and I don’t make perfume blends often.
During the day I use my Lampe Bergers…and buying their fuel has become an expense I feel is impractical. So, I’ve been trying to make some myself, using 91% isopropyl alcohol and a blend of essential oils. I really haven’t had any problems, other than the scents I’ve made are just not very strong. Could it be that my oils are not good enough for this purpose? I’ve done some testing of different brands by putting just a drop of oil onto a piece of paper and allowing it to dry. The Majestic Pure dries almost completely, without leaving much of a mark on the paper, while other brands dry leaving an oily mark. Is it possible that the Majestic Pure has alcohol in it?

Next, try diluting your blend in a carrier oil. You can take 4 drops of any carrier oil such as jojoba, sweet almond, grapeseed, avocado, or any oil you’d like (preferably one without a strong scent) and add 1 drop of your essential oil blend to it. You now have a 20% dilution. Now smell it? What do you think? Does that change the scent? What do you notice first? How does it make you feel now? Describe your thoughts in your notebook.
For a more citrus-y scent that will calm any strong emotions you might be feeling before bed, try combining four drops of bergamot, four drops of frankincense, and two drops of vetiver. Adding frankincense into the mix will soothe any wired thoughts in your brain that might be keeping you awake, relieve any bodily tension you're unknowingly holding on to, and squash any nighttime insomnia that's interrupting your beauty sleep.
I don’t know if there would be an exact way to figure it out without having it tested… if that’s even possible and it’s very expensive. You could blend your own together though… it may not be exactly the same, but would be close. I see they’re using 3 different types of eucalyptus as well as peppermint, myrtle, and marjoram. All these oils contain types of camphor with help with respiratory issues. Pine is a great oil for kids and works well for respiratory conditions. I couldn’t find much info on the Ravintsara except that it was like eucalyptus.
Many people prefer to use essential oils because they’re natural and don’t create the common side effects associated with many sleep medications, such as daytime drowsiness or more serious health risks. For example, a 2010 study found smelling jasmine to be just as effective at calming the nerves as a sleeping pill or sedative, but without any adverse side effects.

I started my journey with essential oils about 2 years ago after the birth of my first child. To say that they changed my life forever would be an understatement. I have created a book called "The Ultimate Beginners Guide to Essential Oils" that will teach you about some of the amazing benefits and uses that essential oils can provide in your home. Click here to get the FREE book.
ROSE and GERANIUM. These two essential oils have similar floral scents, and both have been shown to reduce stress and anxiety, on their own and in combination with other essential oils. Some sleep experts recommend valerian as an essential oil for sleep aromatherapy. Valerian taken as a supplement can be highly beneficial for sleep. I wrote about valerian’s benefits for sleep and stress, here. But the smell of valerian is highly stinky! I recommend trying geranium or rose instead.
The slight grassiness of the basil blends well with the fresh, citrusy notes of grapefruit and orange to evoke feelings of freshly raked leaves on a sunny fall day.  I can’t think of a better way to start an autumn day than with diffusing this blend of grapefruit, orange, and basil.  Since it’s both uplifting and energizing, it’s a great way to start the morning off on the right foot.
Yes, vegetable oils or other forms of fat are the best way to properly dilute essential oils. I believe some aromatherapists say that mixing EOs with heavy whipping cream and adding that to baths is acceptable and safe as the fat in the cream helps disperse the oil, but as far as putting EOs on your skin goes… diluting them in a carrier oil is best. You can find some oils that aren’t greasy. I believe they’re called “dry oils.” Rosehip seed oil is an example, and there are several others. Maybe Google it to get some other examples. Hope this answers your question.
Most commonly, essential oils are used in an essential diffuser together with water. Aromatherapy works quite well over our olfactory system (=sense of smell) as many emotions can be triggered by certain cents alone. While there are other ways to use essential oils, diffuser blending is a fun art and hobby on its own that many essential oil enthusiasts enjoy.
One of my favorite kinds of cookies as a young girl was snickerdoodles.  I just loved helping my mom by flattening out the balls of cookie dough with the bottom of a glass and then watching the cookies expand in the oven.  The characteristic cracking of the cinnamon sugar coating was so fun to watch happen.  This snickerdoodle diffuser blends bring back those childhood memories with it’s sweet, cinnamon aroma.  It’s a great blend to diffuser when I’m feeling a little on edge, as it helps to put me in a good mood and helps me to feel less stressed.
Clary sage is one of the most relaxing, internally balancing, and soothing essential oils out there, and it will provide a potent and soothing aroma to your bedroom throughout the night. Combined with the floral scent of ylang ylang and the earthy musk of sandalwood, you'll be sleeping soundly the minute you cuddle up with your favorite fuzzy blanket.
hi meagan – thanks for your post – i have a lot to read and learn on mixing blends for essential oils – i am having so much trouble because i make CP soap – and so many essential oils can disappear during the saponification process – i have managed a couple of blends but they are masculine in perfume – i so want to find an easy blend of no more than 3 oils that will be feminine and for some reason conjure up the seep south and scarlett – i dont live anywhere near there or even in that country but i have a perfume in my head that i just cant for the life of me create. Is there any chance you could point me in the right direction???

so many other benefits of essential oils – Depending on the specific essential oils used, the diffuser blend can also help improve focus, give me an energy boost, calm me down and help me relax when I’m feeling stressed, clean & purify the air in my home, help my get a great night’s sleep, and more.  I’ve tried to point out some of these essential oils benefits in the descriptions of the fall diffuser blends below.
A stroll through the orchard picking apples is the perfect way to spend a fall afternoon.  When a fall breeze blows through the trees at the orchard near us, it smells very much like this diffuser blend – woody, a little sweet, with a hint of fresh fir from the Christmas tree farm next door.  It’s relaxing and grounding- a great fall diffuser blend to help lessen anxious feelings.
It’s important to note: sandalwood has also been shown to increase wakefulness and alertness, even when it is also triggering physical relaxation. Everyone reacts to scents differently. Sandalwood may deliver sleep benefits for some people, while for others, it may promote wakeful, attentive relaxation. If that’s the case for you, sandalwood isn’t right for nighttime, but you can use it during the day to feel relaxed and alert.
I don’t know if there would be an exact way to figure it out without having it tested… if that’s even possible and it’s very expensive. You could blend your own together though… it may not be exactly the same, but would be close. I see they’re using 3 different types of eucalyptus as well as peppermint, myrtle, and marjoram. All these oils contain types of camphor with help with respiratory issues. Pine is a great oil for kids and works well for respiratory conditions. I couldn’t find much info on the Ravintsara except that it was like eucalyptus.
The use of essential oils for medicinal purposes has an ancient history, going back to early Egyptian, Chinese, and Roman societies. Ever hear of the Hippocratic Oath? That’s the ethical pledge taken by physicians for centuries (now, often taken by students upon graduation from medical school). It’s named for Greek physician, Hippocrates, who studied the effects of essential oils and was a proponent of their healing, health-promoting properties.
The other brands, while cheap, seem really watered down and have very “off” aromas. It worries me to use them because I suspect there are some solvents or chemicals used. They do not claim therapeutic grade. One bottle of Rocky Mountain’s immune boosting blend only lasted me a week when diffusing it, but a bottle of doTERRA’s comparable blend, OnGuard, lasted me several months. The difference in price can seem dramatic, but when you have to use 10 drops of one oil to get the same effects of 1 drop of another… they even out.
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