Every diffuser is different, so refer to the manufacturer's instructions that came with your diffuser to know how many drops is appropriate to add to your particular diffuser. Thicker essential oils and citrus oils must be carefully used in particular types of diffuser models including atomizing and ultrasonic diffusers. Check the instructions that come with your diffuser for specific information.
Many essential oils will fit into more than one category. You can blend them with other essential oils that blend well with the categories they fit in, or you can smell the essential oil and decide which category you think it best fits in. Blending is more about what you think rather than a list of hard and fast rules. I’m not sure if there’s a book on blending or not. I know you can learn more about it by doing it. I also know that some aromatherapists and perfumists teach courses on it so you may want to Google that.
The benefits of neroli essential oil include having sedative, anti-anxiety and calming properties. A 2013 study combined a mixture of lavender, neroli and chamomile essential oils to examine the impact of aromatherapy on the quality of sleep among participants in an intensive care unit. Patients were instructed to inhale the aroma for several minutes. The mixture was then applied to a stone and placed under the patient’s pillowcase overnight.
Would I blend a properly diluted (in carrier oil) say…Eucalyptus, mixture in with my Neem mixture or simply add some drops of Eucalyptus to the Neem mixture with no additional carrier oil? This probably sounds very stupid, but I am a little confused since there is generally a finite number of drops you should use per ounce/ml of carrier oil. Does my question this make sense?
Now that you are familiar with the specific effects of essential oils, you can identify your own sleep problem and test some blends that target that problem alone. For example, a blend of orange oil to relax muscles and cedarwood oil to reduce automatic motor activity could be a powerful intervention against restless legs syndrome. Alternatively, you can mix oils that have a variety of effects to improve all aspects of sleep.
FYI: under the blend for deodorizing animal accident odours, you have listed lemon , tea tree among other citrus oils known to be VERY toxic. I know Young Living touts their oils as “safe” for pets but it’s simply not true. Just ask my neighbour who killed her cat thinking that because she was using “Young Living” it would be fine. Limonene and other components are TOXIC in these oils for cats, they simply cannot metabolize them with their liver. I cringe when I see people gleefully telling how tea tree oil has prevented fleas in their cats..yeah, pretty soon they won’t have a cat for the fleas to bite. Do your research please! Aromatherapy is great but certain oils, tea-tree, clove, citrus oils for example are downright dangerous and can cause toxic overload or death. Regardless of brand used. Sorry I just felt I needed to post this to spare even 1 person heartache over losing a pet just not realizing the extreme potency of EO’s on pets/cats.

add water to your diffuser (tip:  be sure to stop filling below the little line inside your diffuser.  Ultrasonic diffusers need to have space at the top so that the water can move back and forth rapidly enough to turn into the cold mist that comes out of the top of the diffuser.  If you fill the water level too high, then you won’t get as much mist out of the diffuser.  Less water (more space at the top) equals more mist.  Too much water (little to no space at the top) equals little to no mist.)
I’ve searched all my favorite websites on essential oil dilution, and they’re all saying 2% max for skincare products on the face. If you can’t get it smelling the same, it could be that the product you’re referring to has a fragrance oil included? Maybe, maybe not. I’d try to make it as close as you can or change it up to make it your own. Best of luck! I’ve got a man with a beard who would love some beard balm. Let me know if you ever sell it, and I’ll buy some!
This blending ratio doesn’t have a drop limit, but keep in mind that you want your blend to stay small so you don’t waste your oils (in case you don’t like it). You’ll be keeping track of your essential oils and drops on paper. This blending ratio works well with pure combinations (essential oils from one category) and mixed combinations (essential oils from complementary categories).
I came upon your post while doing a search on essential oils and absolutes. I love your writing style, and overall website design, so that you for this lovely post. Here’s a question for you Do you have experience blending the two? I believe they need an emulifier to make them mix since one is distilled with water and the other via an alcohol process. Any suggestions on a natural emulating agent that will keep these two blended together nicely?
Hello! I love this article. So helpful. I am blending some oils for diffusers and used this article to help me formulate a blend to promote clear breathing. It has lemongrass, rosemary, eucaliptus and incense. I used your suggested ratios for top and bottom notes and it smells lovely. But something weird happens! The smell kind of disappears after you first smell it. It’s almost as if this particular blend kind of blocks the olfactory nerves or something, because after the first smell I can hardly smell it at all. My husband and friend tested it for me and something similar happens to them. Do you have any ideas why this might happen? At first I thought I made the blend too weak, but then I realized that the first sniff was great and after that it receded to nothing. Any thoughts?
Word of Caution: The use of essential oils for sleep problems is very popular, but it is important to consider the side effects that some of these oils may have. They are packed with active compounds and chemicals that could negatively interact with medications, exacerbate health conditions, irritate the skin, disturb the stomach, cause blood pressure to drop dangerously low, or leave you feeling fatigued or sluggish. Each oil has individual components and risks, so additional research is necessary before you add one to your daily health regimen. Furthermore, you should always discuss your personal risks before using one of these potent essential oils for sleep.

Investing in an essential oil diffuser is a great first step to filling your room with sleeping-inducing aromas, and there are so many affordable options that will be the perfect vessel for all of your sleepy-time blends. Once you have your diffuser all set up alongside your bed, you'll want to figure out which essential oils combine well to relax your body and calm your mind, so that you'll be able to enjoy a peaceful slumber every single night.
Keep in mind that there are not absolute rights and wrongs when it comes to essential oil categories. Information can sometimes vary from site to site and book to book, and you may need to check in more than one place. The more you use essential oils and become familiar with them, the easier it will be for you to categorize them based off how they smell to you.
Right before I gave up, I came across your site from Pinterest. My heart sunk and I signed up for your daily email list of listening. Every morning I received an email from you before I got out of the bed for the day, which couldn’t have been more perfect and encouraging to start the days. I immediately put your advice in action. My husband and I saw a different child within minutes. It’s been a few weeks since I started and the list could go on! I’m really grateful I came across your site! It changed my relationship 180°. Thank you said so much! I’ve already shared your link with my family and friends! I think every parent needs to read this!
JASMINE. A sweetly floral scent, jasmine appears to have serious sleep-promoting capabilities. Research shows jasmine improves sleep quality and cuts down on restless sleeping, as well as increasing daytime alertness. A 2002 study showed that jasmine delivered all of these sleep benefits, as well as lowering anxiety, even more effectively than lavender.
ROSE and GERANIUM. These two essential oils have similar floral scents, and both have been shown to reduce stress and anxiety, on their own and in combination with other essential oils. Some sleep experts recommend valerian as an essential oil for sleep aromatherapy. Valerian taken as a supplement can be highly beneficial for sleep. I wrote about valerian’s benefits for sleep and stress, here. But the smell of valerian is highly stinky! I recommend trying geranium or rose instead.

To me, they all seem very distinct with stimulating and clarifying properties. You have strong, medicinal or minty type oils like rosemary, peppermint, eucalyptus, you have some woodsy oils such as pine and cypress, and then you have some citrus oils such as grapefruit, lemon, bergamot, neroli. You even have some floral oils like rose, geranium, and ylang ylang and some spicier oils such as black pepper, nutmeg, and ginger.
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