Topical application of essential oils can be especially beneficial, since the oils will actually permeate your skin due to their transdermal properties. As a result, not only will you smell them through your olfactory nerve, but they’ll also enter your bloodstream more quickly. However, if you have sensitive skin or allergies, you should avoid applying topically altogether, or otherwise diffuse the oil with a carrier oil such as organic coconut oil, grapeseed oil, or olive oil.
I’ve used YL oils only a few times whereas I’ve used EG oils much, much more, and honestly I’ve not noticed much of a difference. Maybe it’s because I wasn’t paying attention though. I think YL has great products… their seed to seal promise is reassuring, but I don’t think they’re the “best” or “only” EO company out there. I’ve been very happy with EG oils. I’ve recently tried Plant Therapy oils, and I’m really happy with those. I have a Q&A with that company coming ups soon so stay tuned as it will give you more info on them. All this goes to say, I’d personally try some other EO brands like Plant Therapy or Mountain Rose Herbs before I’d pay the high prices and commit myself to YL. If I wasn’t happy with any of the others companies or oils, then I’d go for YL. We each like different things and there’s really no “wrong” brand. Do what works for you and you feel is best. Everyone is welcome here. I’m not committed to one company. I just what has worked best for me. Currently it’s EG, but that could change as I find other companies I like. I hope this answers your question Jessica and is helpful to you!
Thanks so much Michelle. As far as getting EO recipes… I’m not aware of any NEW books out by any well-known aromatherapists, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t. I’m not an aromatherapist so I’m not in that circle too much. I get a lot of recipes from Vintage Remedies (Jessie Hawkins is an aromatherapist) and Aromahead (an aromatherapy school) as well as older books by respected aromatherapists and companies that sell quality essential oils. I know Plant Therapy, Eden Gardens, and Mountain Rose Herbs shares recipes from time to time. Good luck!!
Hi Jill, I started following you on fb not even knowing you did oils. I joined the oil life in July. So glad you and some of the other people like Keto Mama are apart of this life style. It makes me trust the oils knowing the same people I gravitated to for other aspects in my life also share this life style. I look forward to a new life that blends so well with all my long term beliefs. Do you do any educational videos or anything I can learn from? I plan to build and want to learn from those who have done so well. Any tips would be great and today is a Citrus Explosion day here in the office thanks to your recipe. Have and Awesome Day!!
Essential oil blends are diluted differently depending upon a persons age and the use you have for it. For example, an infant would need a 1% dilution where an older child would do fine with a 2.5% dilution. Adults are usually around a 5% dilution. These dilutions would be for massage oils or therapeutic uses. For cleaning or air fresheners, you may use the 5% dilution or stronger… it just depends on where it’s being used and how.
Middle notes are like the “ties that bind” only they are binding your other essential oils together into a harmonized blend. These are the oils that complete your blend by balancing the light top notes with the deep base notes. The aroma of middle notes lasts longer than those of top notes, but not as long as base notes. These oils can vary in consistency and are often derived from whole herbs and spices.
You can definitely blend them all together Elizabeth, but I’d add in a base note oil (and maybe even another middle note oil) if it were me to round the blend out a bit more. Those oils are very floral and light so I’d add a couple others in to bring it down some, but that’s just me. If you like that scent, you can just use those and that’s it. Especially if you’re using it as a spot treatment sort of thing.
I really enjoyed this post and then I read you’re bio at the end and I liked it even more. I’m about 5 years late in reading it but better late than never. I am new to blending and have been reading whatever I can about techniques and I think your input has really helped me embrace the fact that this is as much of an art as it is a science and although there is a lot of chemistry involved, intuition and patience play a big role in it too. It’s really helped me prioritize what I want to accomplish and this article even helped make blending a little less intimidating/overwhelming. Thank you again for your help and God bless!!
Clary sage is one of the most relaxing, internally balancing, and soothing essential oils out there, and it will provide a potent and soothing aroma to your bedroom throughout the night. Combined with the floral scent of ylang ylang and the earthy musk of sandalwood, you'll be sleeping soundly the minute you cuddle up with your favorite fuzzy blanket.
I found you while searching for information about essential oils. You have a really neat site and with tons of great and valuable information that helps me a lot. I have been using essential oils for some time now, specially for cleaning around my home and for room sprays . I am now making soy candles but I am using essential oils instead of fragrance oils, even though some says that essential oils doesn’t have a very good scent throw in candles. My question for you is, Can I use jasmine absolute in jojoba oil for scent my wax? And what will be the ratio for blending in 6oz of soy wax? Would the 30-50-20 rule apply the same for blending essential oils for candles?
There are many essential oils that can help you get to sleep faster and treat insomnia. Scientific studies have revealed that essential oils such as lavender, valerian, chamomile (and many more) can help you fall asleep faster. In this article I am going to cover proven essential oil for better sleep, including essential oil blends to induce sleep.

Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please confirm any information obtained from or through this web site with other sources, and review all information regarding any medical condition or treatment with your physician. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on this website.

This is a crude list… a rough draft of sorts. You will not be using all of the essential oils you put on this list, and you are not concerning yourself with essential oil brands at this point. You’re basically gathering a lot of ideas and information here. The idea is to come up with a list of 10-20 essential oils to get you started, and as you progress through the steps for blending essential oils, you’ll begin to simplify this big list.
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