Hi, Kelly. The opt-in form is at the very bottom of the post, above the references and author info. If you still don’t see it, it could be a technical issues, and I can sign you up manually with your permission. Just let me know. Update: Hey, Kelly. I’m showing that you’ve been added to the list so you should receive your download link soon. Sorry for the trouble!


Anyone who’s smelled fresh cookies baking in the oven knows that scents have a strong influence on how we feel. When we smell something, our olfactory nerve sends signals directly to our limbic system and amygdala, the parts of our brain responsible for our memory or mood. That’s why certain scents can instantly make us feel brighter, or recall a favorite memory.
A simple way to enjoy the sedative properties of essential oils is to directly inhale the aroma from the bottle. Hold the bottle 1-2 inches away from your nose and take several deep breaths.  It’s recommended that you use a nebulizing diffuser for direct oil inhalation, but do not inhale the vapours directly, as these vapours can be very concentrated.
Here in California, where my family and I live, we’re treated to a bountiful, year-round explosion of plant life. The bright citrus trees, the blooming roses, the clusters of flowering lavender plants all make for amazing sights—and scents. But you don’t have to live in Southern California to enjoy these fragrant smells, or to get the benefits that they can deliver to sleep and mood.  

Your information is the best the best I’ve read yet! I’ve just started using essential oils…I use them in my diffuser at night, as it helps my eternally stuffy nose from allergies. Any scents seem to help, as I believe it’s the moisture it puts into the air that helps. I’ve been using a blend of Bergamot and Lemongrass. Both are made by Majestic Pure, and do just fine.
If you want to opt for a more simple and straightforward essential oil blend, try experimenting with one drop of valerian and one drop of lavender in your diffuser. Lavender is literally the queen of essential oils when it comes to promoting a glorious night of deep sleep because it's known for its highly relaxing, stress-relieving, and calming properties. Just one drop is really all you need to be enveloped by lavender's magical scent.

I am sorry if this is offending, but why does DoTerra price their oils so high? I will never buy from them because I have used them and they are the same quality as all the other brands not greedy for money. For example: I can buy 100% pure (and I have this to compared to other brands, still work the best) Frankincense oil for about $14 for 4oz. But if I got DoTerra, that would cost me a hefty $558 wholesale. DoTerra retail for that would be even more, $744. That is 53x the price of the same quality oil I get. So is DoTerra really 53x better that what I get?
VANILLA. The sweet scent of vanilla is appealing to many people, and it has a long history of use for relaxation and stress relief. Vanilla can have sedative effects on the body. It can reduce hyperactivity and restlessness, quiet the nervous system, and lower blood pressure. It also appears to help relieve anxiety and depression, with a combining both relaxation and an uplift in mood. If the smell of cookies baking relaxes and soothes you, vanilla might be a scent to try for sleep—without the calories!
Multiple studies have found bergamot essential oil both induces the physiological changes that accompany sleep – like reduced heart rate and blood pressure – as well as reduces the thoughts that keep people up at night, like feelings of stress and anxiety. However, bergamot is photosensitive and makes your skin more sensitive to the sun, so topical applications should be avoided before going outside.
VANILLA. The sweet scent of vanilla is appealing to many people, and it has a long history of use for relaxation and stress relief. Vanilla can have sedative effects on the body. It can reduce hyperactivity and restlessness, quiet the nervous system, and lower blood pressure. It also appears to help relieve anxiety and depression, with a combining both relaxation and an uplift in mood. If the smell of cookies baking relaxes and soothes you, vanilla might be a scent to try for sleep—without the calories!
I’m glad you liked the article Jennie. I’m no expert when it comes to aromatherapy so I’d definitely search some other aromatherapy blogs like LearningAboutEOs.com and the Aromahead Blog for arthritis blends, but I think I’d make a cayenne salve like the one here and then add essential oils that contain menthol like peppermint or wintergreen to it.
Hi there – thanks for a great article, I am just starting out in using essential oils and this has been really helpful. I have just made my first batch up today of blends (Relaxing: lavender, bergamot & rosewood. And insect repellent: lavender, peppermint & rosewood. I don’t have a large stock on EO’s yet so limited to what I can use at the moment). However I am little stumped regarding the dilution rates? In your article you gave a 10% and 20%, are these okay to use on the skin? I read on another page that a 2% dilution should be used on the skin? So more like 1 drop of essential oil blend to 4 tsp of carrier oil. Which is correct please? Also, what dilution rate would you recommend on young children? Thanks 🙂
There seems to be new essential oil companies popping up every day, but I’ve used doTERRA essential oils for nearly 4 years and I’ll never go anywhere else. The oils are third-party tested for purity (you can SMELL the difference if you compare them to other brands), ethically sourced around the globe, and I love that doTERRA is a humanitarian-geared company. Hearing stories like this of a Wellness Advocate who is working hard to help Ebola-ravaged areas of Africa makes me so proud to be associated with this company. I’m happy to personally help you get these oils in your home and tell you more about why I chose doTERRA-– click here to connect with me. 

These recipes are offered for educational purposes only. Before using any essential oil, carefully read AromaWeb's Essential Oil Safety Information page. For in-depth information on oil safety issues, read Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young. Do not take any oils internally and do not apply undiluted essential oils, absolutes, CO2s or other concentrated essences onto the skin without advanced essential oil knowledge or consultation from a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. For general dilution information, read AromaWeb's Guide to Diluting Essential Oils. If you are pregnant, epileptic, have liver damage, have cancer, or have any other medical problem, use oils only under the proper guidance of a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. Use extreme caution when using oils with children and consult a qualified aromatherapy practitioner before using oils with children, the elderly, if you have medical issues or are taking medications.
I’ve searched all my favorite websites on essential oil dilution, and they’re all saying 2% max for skincare products on the face. If you can’t get it smelling the same, it could be that the product you’re referring to has a fragrance oil included? Maybe, maybe not. I’d try to make it as close as you can or change it up to make it your own. Best of luck! I’ve got a man with a beard who would love some beard balm. Let me know if you ever sell it, and I’ll buy some!
I also really enjoyed your information on blending. When I first started blending oils I didn’t know much so I would muscle test which ones I needed to use and in what quantity. It’s interesting as I am learning more of the “science” behind it, and I go back to my blend recipes and see how it all played out with the top, middle, and base notes, all in the correct quantities. It’s actually really fun to see. I am enjoying learning more, which makes me realize how much I don’t know!! 🙂
Thanks for the comment. So are you saying that unless the oil is expensive, it’s probably not pure? I understand what you’re saying about the sandalwood oil. I’m sure that’s the case for a lot of oils. I know it’s that way with herbs. Some herbs you harvest the first year, some the second, and it even makes a difference when it comes to the part of the plant you use. I’m just wondering if there’s a way to really tell if one is pure… for the lay person of course. Also, where were you trained at? I’m not aware of many aromatherapy schools so it’s always nice to hear of more.
Your information is the best the best I’ve read yet! I’ve just started using essential oils…I use them in my diffuser at night, as it helps my eternally stuffy nose from allergies. Any scents seem to help, as I believe it’s the moisture it puts into the air that helps. I’ve been using a blend of Bergamot and Lemongrass. Both are made by Majestic Pure, and do just fine.
If we could spend each day of the week swimming in the ocean, boating on a lake, or twirling in the rain, we would! There’s nothing that smells more amazing than the seaside or a summer storm, and each of these blends will remind you of your treasured aqua adventures. Grab your trusty diffuser, add some YL essential oils, and press “go” on crashing waves and swimming pool cannon balls!
For sleep: A body of research shows that essential oils can provide relief for disrupted sleep and improve sleep quality in adults. A 2017 study compared the effects of aromatherapy and acupressure massage on sleep quality and overall quality of life in women. Researchers found that a blend of sleep-promoting essential oils worked more effectively to improve both sleep quality and quality of life than acupressure. The blended oil was also more effective at improving sleep than a single essential oil, lavender.
Hey! Sorry to be commenting on such an old post, I was googling and found you. =) You have a lot of helpful information posted, I really appreciate it! I am a nursing student and I’ve just started to use essential oils for studying and test taxing anxiety. I am using lavender and rosemary because I’ve read a lot of research on these and they seem to be scientifically proven to help with testing. I also have ADHD and of course like all nursing students, a ton of test taking anxiety. I am wondering if I could combine the two oils to help me with my exams? If so what would your ratio recommendation be? The rosemary alone seems to help me concentrate a lot (probably as much as my adderall) but I feel more anxious when using it (also like when I take my adderall). The lavender alone makes me so relaxed I’m a little on the fuzzy side. I have done both of these with the diffuser and applying topically with fractioned coconut oil. When I apply topically I make a rollerball with 10mL of fractioned coconut oil and 20 drops of essential oil. Any advice or tips you can give would be greatly appreciated!

Hi there – thanks for a great article, I am just starting out in using essential oils and this has been really helpful. I have just made my first batch up today of blends (Relaxing: lavender, bergamot & rosewood. And insect repellent: lavender, peppermint & rosewood. I don’t have a large stock on EO’s yet so limited to what I can use at the moment). However I am little stumped regarding the dilution rates? In your article you gave a 10% and 20%, are these okay to use on the skin? I read on another page that a 2% dilution should be used on the skin? So more like 1 drop of essential oil blend to 4 tsp of carrier oil. Which is correct please? Also, what dilution rate would you recommend on young children? Thanks 🙂
ROSE and GERANIUM. These two essential oils have similar floral scents, and both have been shown to reduce stress and anxiety, on their own and in combination with other essential oils. Some sleep experts recommend valerian as an essential oil for sleep aromatherapy. Valerian taken as a supplement can be highly beneficial for sleep. I wrote about valerian’s benefits for sleep and stress, here. But the smell of valerian is highly stinky! I recommend trying geranium or rose instead.
Thank you for this lovely list of essential oil recipes. I have used essential oils for a long time, but never quite figured out how to blend them for calming and physiological benefits. However, I must say, your impressive recipes appear to be right on the money. The first one I’ll try is the “Deep Breath,” I believe it’s exactly what I’ll love. Again, thank you..

I hear what you’re saying Scott, and I’m not disagreeing with you. I don’t know a whole lot about the process, but I do know that bigger companies follow harvesting, storage, and extracting guidelines that not all home distillers follow. I also know that bigger companies have their oils routinely tested by 3rd party labs to check them for certain things. Again, not all home distillers do that. I’m sure that’s why people trust bigger EO companies, but if I were making and selling my own oils from home, I’d be sure I did those things and shouted it from the rooftops so people would know my oils were top notch. Thanks for sharing your process!
It’s key to purchase oils that are advertised as “pure” or “100%” essential oils and list the oil’s botanical Latin name. Ones that say “perfume oil” or “fragrance oil” often use synthetic ingredients, so while they smell nice, they don’t provide the same benefits and may even contain other additives more likely to irritate your skin. If possible, look for organic oils with a non-GMO or “Therapeutic grade” label, meaning they don’t have toxins and only use pure chemicals.
Hi Jill, I started following you on fb not even knowing you did oils. I joined the oil life in July. So glad you and some of the other people like Keto Mama are apart of this life style. It makes me trust the oils knowing the same people I gravitated to for other aspects in my life also share this life style. I look forward to a new life that blends so well with all my long term beliefs. Do you do any educational videos or anything I can learn from? I plan to build and want to learn from those who have done so well. Any tips would be great and today is a Citrus Explosion day here in the office thanks to your recipe. Have and Awesome Day!!
I’ve learned a very important lesson recently. A friend who sells young living told me that I could put a few drops of lemon oil in my water, as well as orange and grapefruit. Dummy me didn’t research this. You know, “well she’s a friend and seems to know a lot about oils. I can trust what she says”. One night I couldn’t sleep well, even had my lavender in my diffuser. I kept wondering “what the hheeeecckkk”. Prayed a bit, and then listened and read up on grapefruit oil. Wellllll that was my first lesson DO NOT TAKE OILS INTERNALLY and grapefruit oil is an energizer.

Diffusers that requires water destroys the therapeutic health properties of the oils. The only type of diffuser you should use is a wood or ceramic and glass nebulizer diffuser. doTERRA are OK oils but they are, just like Young Living, way over priced and have both been found to adulterate some of their oils when the plant material runs low, real expensive or rare. Their members will argue saying, “No way all their oils are 100% pure”. Well think about it, the lab tests are run by the company itself. So people just tend to believe whatever the company tell them. I’m still doing the research and have found a couple of places to get high quality organic therapeutic grade oils at half the price and not the over priced marketing ploy of the big companies making big bucks off their loyal members. They can easily do this because most people don’t want to take the time to do the research themselves. Once I became disable with life threatening illnesses, (Cancer,ect.), I could no longer afford wasting money on high prices oils.


Diluting your EO oil blends depends on how you plan to use them, Elizabeth. If you’re going to apply it to your skin, you’d want to dilute it with a carrier oil. If you’re using it in a diffuser then you’ll only need a few drops to scent a room in your home. The smell of patchouli is strong. Diluting it in anything (carrier oil, salve, soap, etc.) will tone it down. When you use it in a diffuser or any place it’s not really diluted, just use less so the scent isn’t so overwhelming… or combine it with an oil to tone it down more. Hope this helps!
Oh, lavender essential oil is great, and I’d definitely consider it a go-to oil. It’s an easy one for beginners to use, it’s mostly safe, and it has a lot of different uses. I didn’t exclude it from the list for any particular reason. I just went through and tried to select oils with different notes so people would have a good variety of EO choices when making their blends. Hope that answers your question!
Your information is the best the best I’ve read yet! I’ve just started using essential oils…I use them in my diffuser at night, as it helps my eternally stuffy nose from allergies. Any scents seem to help, as I believe it’s the moisture it puts into the air that helps. I’ve been using a blend of Bergamot and Lemongrass. Both are made by Majestic Pure, and do just fine.

One of my favorite kinds of cookies as a young girl was snickerdoodles.  I just loved helping my mom by flattening out the balls of cookie dough with the bottom of a glass and then watching the cookies expand in the oven.  The characteristic cracking of the cinnamon sugar coating was so fun to watch happen.  This snickerdoodle diffuser blends bring back those childhood memories with it’s sweet, cinnamon aroma.  It’s a great blend to diffuser when I’m feeling a little on edge, as it helps to put me in a good mood and helps me to feel less stressed.
Steam distilled from fragrant orange blossoms, Neroli Essential Oil can be an amazing oil for easing stress and helping the body to relax and helping to unwind after a rough day. It's very aromatic and a little goes a long way. It pairs beautifully with lavender and petitgrain essential oils. Petitgrain Essential Oil is distilled from the twigs, branches and leaves of the same tree as Neroli Essential Oil.
The only reason I say to use limited drops in this article is so you don’t waste your oils as you’re experimenting on what blends you like. Once you have a good sample blend for your air freshener and you like it, you can make more of the blend in a larger amount. So your 3 drops becomes 30 drops, your 5 drops becomes 50 drops and your 2 drops becomes 20 drops and so on. Once you have your blend… you are still going to need to dilute it in your carrier oil of choice.

During the day I use my Lampe Bergers…and buying their fuel has become an expense I feel is impractical. So, I’ve been trying to make some myself, using 91% isopropyl alcohol and a blend of essential oils. I really haven’t had any problems, other than the scents I’ve made are just not very strong. Could it be that my oils are not good enough for this purpose? I’ve done some testing of different brands by putting just a drop of oil onto a piece of paper and allowing it to dry. The Majestic Pure dries almost completely, without leaving much of a mark on the paper, while other brands dry leaving an oily mark. Is it possible that the Majestic Pure has alcohol in it?
I know I’ve said it quite a few times already, but when it comes to blending essential oils there is no “one right way” to do it. The same is true when it comes to essential oil blending ratios. Like most essential oil blending concepts, it comes down to what you like. With that said, I’m going to share a few of the simplest blending ratios I’ve personally used to help give you a place to start.
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