I’m glad you liked the article Jennie. I’m no expert when it comes to aromatherapy so I’d definitely search some other aromatherapy blogs like LearningAboutEOs.com and the Aromahead Blog for arthritis blends, but I think I’d make a cayenne salve like the one here and then add essential oils that contain menthol like peppermint or wintergreen to it.
A question that you may or may not be able to help me with. . . I am trying to make a citrus blend to use in soap. I think I have the blend of EOs that I want to use. What I am not sure about is diluting it in a carrier oil. How diluted should I make it? Or should I not dilute it at all so it is strong enough to make it through the soap process? Thanks for any help!
Back in the early days of Growing Up Herbal, I made herbal skincare products for children and sold them on Etsy. Those days were full of hurdles… learning about setting up shop, getting comfortable marketing my business, and refining my product line. Business was slow, and I felt like I’d never get ahead and have a successful shop. Sales trickled in sporadically. Customers would make small purchases, but they rarely came back to buy again. My products were never featured anywhere, and traffic to my shop was pitiful.
I’m so so sorry Diana, but I’m definitely not a perfumist. That blend sounds awesome… like something I’d definitely wear, but I’m no help. This article is a basis how to on how to blend… I don’t know enough about the smells of individual oils to be able to tell you what you’re missing and how much of each oil to use. You’ll just have to experiment and see or consult with someone who makes essential oil perfumes. Thanks!
CITRUS. Similar to sandalwood, this is a group of scents that can be stimulating or sleep-promoting, depending on your individual reaction and the type of citrus oil used. Bergamot, a type of orange, has been shown to relieve anxiety and improve sleep quality. Lemon oil has demonstrated anxiety and depression-relieving effects in research. Citrus may help some people fall asleep more easily, while others may find these fresh, bright scents are relaxing, but not sleep-promoting. If citrus scents are stimulating to you, don’t use them before bed—but do consider using them during the day, to help you feel both refreshed and relaxed.
Hello! I love this article. So helpful. I am blending some oils for diffusers and used this article to help me formulate a blend to promote clear breathing. It has lemongrass, rosemary, eucaliptus and incense. I used your suggested ratios for top and bottom notes and it smells lovely. But something weird happens! The smell kind of disappears after you first smell it. It’s almost as if this particular blend kind of blocks the olfactory nerves or something, because after the first smell I can hardly smell it at all. My husband and friend tested it for me and something similar happens to them. Do you have any ideas why this might happen? At first I thought I made the blend too weak, but then I realized that the first sniff was great and after that it receded to nothing. Any thoughts?

Thanks for your info Meaghan. It was very helpful. I have to say that I love, love essential oils. I did so much research and have used them for years. More than a year ago I decided to give Young Living a try after much research and even though I have tried other companies I have to say that I absolutely love Young Living. I know there are other great companies out there because I have used them. However Young Living is absolutely a wonderful company and their oils are amazing. I totally trust them and I have had such success with them health wise. I am a member of their Blue Spruce Club and everything I ever want to know about how to use essential oils is there. I love Thieves, YLs blend. It is amazing for everything. I still use other oils but YL is my favourite!
You can definitley combine both, Elizabeth. The ratio is totally your choice depending on what helps you. One thing you could do would be to make two separate personal inhalers (one with rosemary and one with lavender) and take a few deep breaths of the rosemary as needed, then, if you start feeling too anxious, start using the lavender one to calm you a bit. Maybe try it BEFORE you take a test… like during a study session, to see if it helps or not. Best of luck in your studies… I remember a lot of late nights getting ready for those big tests!
Great points Angie. I really love the work Lea Harris is doing at LearningAboutEOs.com when she tests all the different oils and shows the results. Even the big companies are noticing and thanking her for doing that… including doTERRA and Young Living… which says a lot about the companies not minding other people testing their products because they have confidence in what they’re selling.
Keep in mind that there are not absolute rights and wrongs when it comes to essential oil categories. Information can sometimes vary from site to site and book to book, and you may need to check in more than one place. The more you use essential oils and become familiar with them, the easier it will be for you to categorize them based off how they smell to you.

Please note: Products mentioned in this article have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products and information on this page are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. This website is not a substitute for professional care.  Always consult your medical doctor regarding your medical care. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.
Hey, Rachel. It looks like you may have too many top note EOs in your blend which is why you’re not getting that long-lasting scent from it. Rosemary is the only oil you listed that is a middle note, but it’s also considered a bit of a top note too. In all the blending formulas, the middle notes make up the largest portion of your blend with top notes coming in second and base notes coming in last as they mainly ground or stabalize your blend. If I were you, I would go through the process again, adding in more middle note oils and maybe taking out some top note oils. Or, you could always find some middle note oils that fit with the purpose of your blend and blend well with the oils you’re already using. In that case, all you’d need to do would be to adjust the amounts of each oil in the final blend (using the suggested formulas) so that your middle note oils make up the largest portion of the blend. Hope that helps! PS… There are also some essential oils that stimulate nerves that allow you to smell them once and then you can no longer smell them until the nerves are destimulated. I can’t remember which exact EOs that do that, but I read about it from an aromatherapist a while back. I’ve not looked into it much, but I thought that was interesting.

I hear what you’re saying Scott, and I’m not disagreeing with you. I don’t know a whole lot about the process, but I do know that bigger companies follow harvesting, storage, and extracting guidelines that not all home distillers follow. I also know that bigger companies have their oils routinely tested by 3rd party labs to check them for certain things. Again, not all home distillers do that. I’m sure that’s why people trust bigger EO companies, but if I were making and selling my own oils from home, I’d be sure I did those things and shouted it from the rooftops so people would know my oils were top notch. Thanks for sharing your process!
Hi Cari. I don’t have much experience with different types of EO diffusers. I have a Young Living diffuser that my MIL bought me, and I love it. I use it often and it works great. It’s pricy, but totally worth it to have one in my opinion. However, I have heard others say that the cheaper ones work just as well. I know Plant Therapy carries diffusers, and I think they have some really great ones that are lower priced. Hope that helps!

It’s worth it to have a high quality diffuser to diffuse essential oils. This Smiley Daisy Essential Oil Diffuser, Quite Cool Mist Humidifier, 350 ml has been around for a long while and has great reviews. Smiley Daisy is a cold air diffuser, as well as a humidifier, which is great because it releases moisture into the air and is helpful in providing relief for dry skin, dry throat and cold and flu symptoms such as irritated nasal passages and more. Order below:
Leslie wants to create an energizing essential oil blend for herself. She plans on diffusing it during her morning shower, and her goal is to feel more awake, energized, and uplifted. She wants her essential oil blend to be a combination of aromatic blending (blended primarily for fragrance) and therapeutic blending (blended primarily for an emotional or physical effect).
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