You can definitley combine both, Elizabeth. The ratio is totally your choice depending on what helps you. One thing you could do would be to make two separate personal inhalers (one with rosemary and one with lavender) and take a few deep breaths of the rosemary as needed, then, if you start feeling too anxious, start using the lavender one to calm you a bit. Maybe try it BEFORE you take a test… like during a study session, to see if it helps or not. Best of luck in your studies… I remember a lot of late nights getting ready for those big tests!
Hey Sarah! I’m actually not an aromatherapist, and I don’t make blends for people. I just share what I’m learning and how I do things. My suggestions for you would be to come up with a cleaning routine that keeps your house clean (which will help with dust mites as you know) and search Google for EO bug blends. I actually have some on GUH, but I’m not sure how they’d work for dust mites. You may also want to work with an aromatherapist if you have more questions. Thanks!
Our sense of smell is directly wired to the brain’s centers of memory and emotion. Cells inside the nose detect smells in our environment, and send information to the brain, via the olfactory nerve. (We also have a cluster of cells the top of the throat that detect scents from the food we consume, and pass that information along the same olfactory channel to the brain.) The information about smell does immediately to the limbic system of the brain, which includes regions like the amygdala that control emotional reactions and memory.  
FYI: under the blend for deodorizing animal accident odours, you have listed lemon , tea tree among other citrus oils known to be VERY toxic. I know Young Living touts their oils as “safe” for pets but it’s simply not true. Just ask my neighbour who killed her cat thinking that because she was using “Young Living” it would be fine. Limonene and other components are TOXIC in these oils for cats, they simply cannot metabolize them with their liver. I cringe when I see people gleefully telling how tea tree oil has prevented fleas in their cats..yeah, pretty soon they won’t have a cat for the fleas to bite. Do your research please! Aromatherapy is great but certain oils, tea-tree, clove, citrus oils for example are downright dangerous and can cause toxic overload or death. Regardless of brand used. Sorry I just felt I needed to post this to spare even 1 person heartache over losing a pet just not realizing the extreme potency of EO’s on pets/cats.
Topical application of essential oils can be especially beneficial, since the oils will actually permeate your skin due to their transdermal properties. As a result, not only will you smell them through your olfactory nerve, but they’ll also enter your bloodstream more quickly. However, if you have sensitive skin or allergies, you should avoid applying topically altogether, or otherwise diffuse the oil with a carrier oil such as organic coconut oil, grapeseed oil, or olive oil.
I’m so so sorry Diana, but I’m definitely not a perfumist. That blend sounds awesome… like something I’d definitely wear, but I’m no help. This article is a basis how to on how to blend… I don’t know enough about the smells of individual oils to be able to tell you what you’re missing and how much of each oil to use. You’ll just have to experiment and see or consult with someone who makes essential oil perfumes. Thanks!

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Thanks for the comment. So are you saying that unless the oil is expensive, it’s probably not pure? I understand what you’re saying about the sandalwood oil. I’m sure that’s the case for a lot of oils. I know it’s that way with herbs. Some herbs you harvest the first year, some the second, and it even makes a difference when it comes to the part of the plant you use. I’m just wondering if there’s a way to really tell if one is pure… for the lay person of course. Also, where were you trained at? I’m not aware of many aromatherapy schools so it’s always nice to hear of more.

I believe sandalwood is a base not Annette. Of course you can combine whatever you like together if you think it smells good. I don’t think there are any black and white rules when it comes to blending as long as you have something from each note so your blend is “well rounded”. And from my understanding categories and notes are all relative to the other oils you’re referencing… they too are not black and white. Hope that helps some!
I’ve never used it before, Joan, but I would imagine a little would go a long way and that it would be a great addition to muscle blends! I’d also guess it would fall into the “spicy” category of essential oils, and I would also decrease its total amount in any blend I made it in as it’s probably a very strong oil. I do use cayenne along with some other essential oils in the muscle rub blend that I make for my medicine cabinet. You can find that recipe in my How To Make Herbal Ointments, Salves, and Balms: The Ultimate How-To Guide if you’re interested.
You could try using equal amounts of each and see how it turns out for you. The problem I find with that is that the stronger scents will tend to overpower the lighter scents because too much was used. For example if you were to blend lavender and patchouli and you used equal amounts, your blend is probably not going to smell as good as if you used more lavender than patchouli because patchouli is very strong and it can smell bad if too much is used.
If you want to opt for a more simple and straightforward essential oil blend, try experimenting with one drop of valerian and one drop of lavender in your diffuser. Lavender is literally the queen of essential oils when it comes to promoting a glorious night of deep sleep because it's known for its highly relaxing, stress-relieving, and calming properties. Just one drop is really all you need to be enveloped by lavender's magical scent.
One of my favorite kinds of cookies as a young girl was snickerdoodles.  I just loved helping my mom by flattening out the balls of cookie dough with the bottom of a glass and then watching the cookies expand in the oven.  The characteristic cracking of the cinnamon sugar coating was so fun to watch happen.  This snickerdoodle diffuser blends bring back those childhood memories with it’s sweet, cinnamon aroma.  It’s a great blend to diffuser when I’m feeling a little on edge, as it helps to put me in a good mood and helps me to feel less stressed.
Jill, thank you for your blog post. I have never used essential oils. Thanks for the information on the different oils and the combinations. I have heard of essential oils, just was never sure which oils go together. I want to try them. I have 10 med size plastic containers full of candles of every shape and color for each season and plus some. In the closet and under the bed. I hardly use them much anymore, since they just don’t seem to hold the smell when they are burning. They just sit in the plastic boxes taking up space.

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