Hi Megan! I’m new to oils, and I’m looking specifically for oils that help with anxiety, depression, insomnia, and colds/flu. I have right now sweet orange, lemongrass, frankincense, tea tree, peppermint, rosemary, eucalyptus, and lavender. Could you offer some direction/advice on where to start with what I have? I would be using them by diffusing with a diffuser or using the steam from taking a shower if that helps. Thanks!

Diluting your EO oil blends depends on how you plan to use them, Elizabeth. If you’re going to apply it to your skin, you’d want to dilute it with a carrier oil. If you’re using it in a diffuser then you’ll only need a few drops to scent a room in your home. The smell of patchouli is strong. Diluting it in anything (carrier oil, salve, soap, etc.) will tone it down. When you use it in a diffuser or any place it’s not really diluted, just use less so the scent isn’t so overwhelming… or combine it with an oil to tone it down more. Hope this helps!
Anyone who’s smelled fresh cookies baking in the oven knows that scents have a strong influence on how we feel. When we smell something, our olfactory nerve sends signals directly to our limbic system and amygdala, the parts of our brain responsible for our memory or mood. That’s why certain scents can instantly make us feel brighter, or recall a favorite memory.
I know I’ve said it quite a few times already, but when it comes to blending essential oils there is no “one right way” to do it. The same is true when it comes to essential oil blending ratios. Like most essential oil blending concepts, it comes down to what you like. With that said, I’m going to share a few of the simplest blending ratios I’ve personally used to help give you a place to start.
I also really enjoyed your information on blending. When I first started blending oils I didn’t know much so I would muscle test which ones I needed to use and in what quantity. It’s interesting as I am learning more of the “science” behind it, and I go back to my blend recipes and see how it all played out with the top, middle, and base notes, all in the correct quantities. It’s actually really fun to see. I am enjoying learning more, which makes me realize how much I don’t know!! 🙂
Sleeping problems include a wide range of conditions. Some people battle to fall asleep. Others fall asleep easily but cannot remain asleep for long enough. Still, others fall and remain asleep, but their sleep is interrupted by bad dreams and/or physical movement of their arms and legs. All of these people are left feeling tired the next day. Find out how to use essential oil to treat these sleeping problems.
Hi, Dorothy. Great question, and this may be something you’ll want to run by an aromatherapist as they have more training in how EOs are made. But, from my understanding, whether the essential oil is extracted via steam (water), alcohol, or CO2… none of that comes through in the final product. As in, you don’t actually have water or alcohol or CO2 in the final essential oil. So, when you’re blending, you’re actually blending oil with oil regardless of the extraction process and emulsifiers aren’t needed. Now, I could be totally wrong there. Again, you’ll need to ask someone more knowledgeable in that area. Hope this helps.
A simple way to enjoy the sedative properties of essential oils is to directly inhale the aroma from the bottle. Hold the bottle 1-2 inches away from your nose and take several deep breaths.  It’s recommended that you use a nebulizing diffuser for direct oil inhalation, but do not inhale the vapours directly, as these vapours can be very concentrated.

My grandma always made ginger molasses cookies.  Sweet, spicy, soft, and chewy- they had it all.  Fall wasn’t fall without her gingersnaps.  It’s a tradition I still keep up to this day.  With this diffuser blend, I can have the scent of her fresh-based cookies every day (without the sugar and calories).  And even better than that, the ginger essential oil has properties much like my grandma herself- helping people to be fully present in the current moment.
I’ve used YL oils only a few times whereas I’ve used EG oils much, much more, and honestly I’ve not noticed much of a difference. Maybe it’s because I wasn’t paying attention though. I think YL has great products… their seed to seal promise is reassuring, but I don’t think they’re the “best” or “only” EO company out there. I’ve been very happy with EG oils. I’ve recently tried Plant Therapy oils, and I’m really happy with those. I have a Q&A with that company coming ups soon so stay tuned as it will give you more info on them. All this goes to say, I’d personally try some other EO brands like Plant Therapy or Mountain Rose Herbs before I’d pay the high prices and commit myself to YL. If I wasn’t happy with any of the others companies or oils, then I’d go for YL. We each like different things and there’s really no “wrong” brand. Do what works for you and you feel is best. Everyone is welcome here. I’m not committed to one company. I just what has worked best for me. Currently it’s EG, but that could change as I find other companies I like. I hope this answers your question Jessica and is helpful to you!
Humm, I can’t tell you much without seeing the version of the EO you purchased, Valerie, but one reason why they could have said that is that the EO you bought is a cold-pressed orange EO which can cause photosensitivity after sun exposure. Cold-pressed citrus oils are known to do that, as well as a few others. Here’s a great post on this topic. What you can do is use it for flavoring things, cleaning, diffusing, or in your skin care products during the winter months when you won’t get as much sun exposure and purchase a steam-distilled orange EO to use during the summer months. Hope this helps!
I believe your comment on this post about diffuser recipes said, “doTERRA oils are overpriced” or something along those lines. As someone who is deeply involved with doTERRA, knows what goes into doTERRA oils, has been to the fields where the plants are grown and met the farmers, and also compared doTERRA oils to a number of other brands, I wholeheartedly disagree with your comment. I believe doTERRA oils are an amazing value.
I was introduced to dottera oils 4 years ago. I have also used other oils for diffusing. There is a huge difference between oils in my opinion. Although various oil manufacturers claim to be 100% pure you can tell the difference as compared to dottera which has purity in scent. Many oils have carrier oils added to them so although they claim to be pure they are not. Also dottera oils are therapeutic grade and many can be ingested safely. I believe if you are going to inhale a substance it should be 100% pure with no additives. As a nurse I know this is important. Just my opinion.
In the post below and accompanying free printable, you’ll find what I think are the 30 best fall essential oil blends.  I’ve kept my most popular classic recipes and added 15 new fall diffuser recipes-  pumpkin pie, apple orchard, snickerdoodle cookies, sweater weather, orange cinnamon rolls, warm apple pie, evening by the fire, vanilla spice, crisp autumn, flannel, cozy home, and many more.  

Your information is the best the best I’ve read yet! I’ve just started using essential oils…I use them in my diffuser at night, as it helps my eternally stuffy nose from allergies. Any scents seem to help, as I believe it’s the moisture it puts into the air that helps. I’ve been using a blend of Bergamot and Lemongrass. Both are made by Majestic Pure, and do just fine.
The other brands, while cheap, seem really watered down and have very “off” aromas. It worries me to use them because I suspect there are some solvents or chemicals used. They do not claim therapeutic grade. One bottle of Rocky Mountain’s immune boosting blend only lasted me a week when diffusing it, but a bottle of doTERRA’s comparable blend, OnGuard, lasted me several months. The difference in price can seem dramatic, but when you have to use 10 drops of one oil to get the same effects of 1 drop of another… they even out.
srrryy i forgot to tell that im talkin about essential oils and im using three oils for this purpose lavender bcoz of its good soothing frangrance and as well as mosquito repellent property and the other two are eucalyptus essential oil and clove oil which has great mosquito repellent need your help how to mix it and use it. it may be chances that after mixing these oils only aroma will come and the other property of mpsquito repellent will not work or may be aftr mixing aroma can be effectd so which mixing of which oil give optimum performance i need help about it give your suggestion plzzzz
I hear what you’re saying Scott, and I’m not disagreeing with you. I don’t know a whole lot about the process, but I do know that bigger companies follow harvesting, storage, and extracting guidelines that not all home distillers follow. I also know that bigger companies have their oils routinely tested by 3rd party labs to check them for certain things. Again, not all home distillers do that. I’m sure that’s why people trust bigger EO companies, but if I were making and selling my own oils from home, I’d be sure I did those things and shouted it from the rooftops so people would know my oils were top notch. Thanks for sharing your process!
Clary sage is one of the most relaxing, internally balancing, and soothing essential oils out there, and it will provide a potent and soothing aroma to your bedroom throughout the night. Combined with the floral scent of ylang ylang and the earthy musk of sandalwood, you'll be sleeping soundly the minute you cuddle up with your favorite fuzzy blanket.
As far as the testing goes… I don’t know much about it other than I think she did opt for more expensive and more accurate testing the 2nd and 3rd time she had oils tested. I’m not sure on that though. All I know is that her tests got a lot of attention… much of which brought about changes from some of the bigger EO companies so she must have done something right.
For depression: Depression and sleep problems often go hand in hand. A number of studies have examined the effects of aromatherapy using essential oils in people with depression and depressive symptoms, both with and without anxiety. Aromatherapy can help improve depressive symptoms, according to the results of several studies. A study found aromatherapy improved both depression and anxiety in a group of post-partum women. And a 2016 analysis found aromatherapy effective in reducing stress and depression—as well as symptoms of menopause—in middle-aged women.
Organic Infusions, Inc is a farm direct, wholesale essential oil supplier committed to purity. During inhalation of an authentic certified organic or wildcrafted therapeutic grade essential oil, you are connecting to the very life force of the plant. The energetic vibration of the plant unites with the body harmonics within each of us. Organic Infusions understands that when aromatherapy essential oils are altered by artificial means, the precious essence of those oils is forever changed. For this reason Organic Infusions does not carry essential oils that have been diluted, altered, or synthetically modified.
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