Hello. I’m an EO newbie. My children and I this weekend created some blends for their new atomizing diffusers for their rooms. I saw a post that said something about the need to use a carrier oil for diffusing. Is this necessary and/or safe for the machine that I am using? We have just been diffusing with “straight” EO’s and it seems right. Am I causing more harm than good?
Now that you are familiar with the specific effects of essential oils, you can identify your own sleep problem and test some blends that target that problem alone. For example, a blend of orange oil to relax muscles and cedarwood oil to reduce automatic motor activity could be a powerful intervention against restless legs syndrome. Alternatively, you can mix oils that have a variety of effects to improve all aspects of sleep.
Hey Shelley! Good for you for starting to add EOs to your soaps. I love scented, homemade soaps! As for what oils to mix with the ones you already have, let me direct you back to the post on blending. It will help you find other EOs to add to the ones you have and to come up with blends that work for your soaps. Figure out what categories and notes the oils you have are and then work on finding other oils that complement them. It’s hands on. You have to get oils and try out different blends and decide on what YOU like. Lastly, “apple” is not an essential oil… it’s a fragrance oil and it isn’t considered natural. If you’re going for “all natural” soaps and scents you may want to rethink that one. You could replace it with chamomile as many people think chamomile has an apple-like scent. You’ll need to decide if Roman chamomile or German Chamomile is better. Thanks for your comment, and I hope this has helped you some.
Anyway… thank you for this post! I have been interested in making custom blends but I know enough about oils to understand mixing them changes the compounds and effects of the constituents, and the order in which they are mixed will influence the properties, too. But I don’t know anything beyond that such as what to combine and how to go about blending. This is a great and easy to understand introduction. Thank you! And if you have a link to the article you mention having read on the topic of quality and labels, Meagan, I’d love to read it, too!

Hello I just recently got a divorce. And for a couple weeks could not sleep so the dr. put me on sleeping medicine I do not want to be on them and I was wondering if you could tell me what would be the best essential oils that I could use for falling asleep I use a necklace infuser. By using that would that work or should I apply to the body like you have said in this site. I use lemon oil for depression. What would you have me used to sleep thank you so much for your helping and I really appreciate your time and knowledge on helping me learn thank you.
Lavender essential oil may also improve sleep quality for individuals in hospital environments. Sleep deprivation is common for hospital patients and may have a negative impact on recovery and general well-being. In a 2014 study, lavender essential oil was used as part of an aromatherapy treatment to promote sleep. Researchers noted that patients who received the essential oil for sleep had a decrease in blood pressure and a higher overall sleep score.5

This makes smell unique among our senses. Information we take in from our other senses travels first to another region of the brain, the thalamus, which acts as a relay station, passing along sensory data to the other parts of the brain that produce our sensory perceptions. Only smell moves directly to the brain’s emotion and memory center. That’s why those memories you associate with the scent of garden roses, or banana bread baking in the oven, come on so quickly and so strongly.
If you want to opt for a more simple and straightforward essential oil blend, try experimenting with one drop of valerian and one drop of lavender in your diffuser. Lavender is literally the queen of essential oils when it comes to promoting a glorious night of deep sleep because it's known for its highly relaxing, stress-relieving, and calming properties. Just one drop is really all you need to be enveloped by lavender's magical scent.

You can definitely blend them all together Elizabeth, but I’d add in a base note oil (and maybe even another middle note oil) if it were me to round the blend out a bit more. Those oils are very floral and light so I’d add a couple others in to bring it down some, but that’s just me. If you like that scent, you can just use those and that’s it. Especially if you’re using it as a spot treatment sort of thing.

I have done extensive research on essential oils. NO oil should ever be injested. There are only a few food grade oils that can be injested. There is no such thing a therapeutic grade oil. Do more research. Many companies claim 100% pure and that may be, it’s the process that makes them unpure. If you want the real thing you must only buy USDA ORGANIC. The process is guaranteed minimal. No machinery so you not getting metals in your oil which is harmful to us. I hope this helps.
For a more citrus-y scent that will calm any strong emotions you might be feeling before bed, try combining four drops of bergamot, four drops of frankincense, and two drops of vetiver. Adding frankincense into the mix will soothe any wired thoughts in your brain that might be keeping you awake, relieve any bodily tension you're unknowingly holding on to, and squash any nighttime insomnia that's interrupting your beauty sleep.

Anyway… thank you for this post! I have been interested in making custom blends but I know enough about oils to understand mixing them changes the compounds and effects of the constituents, and the order in which they are mixed will influence the properties, too. But I don’t know anything beyond that such as what to combine and how to go about blending. This is a great and easy to understand introduction. Thank you! And if you have a link to the article you mention having read on the topic of quality and labels, Meagan, I’d love to read it, too!


Lavender essential oil may also improve sleep quality for individuals in hospital environments. Sleep deprivation is common for hospital patients and may have a negative impact on recovery and general well-being. In a 2014 study, lavender essential oil was used as part of an aromatherapy treatment to promote sleep. Researchers noted that patients who received the essential oil for sleep had a decrease in blood pressure and a higher overall sleep score.5
So again, I don’t know how to figure out the ratios except that the first ingredient is supposed to be the largest and they work their way down to less and less. You definitely could follow this as a guide and try blending small amounts of oil until you find a combination you like and seems to be effective on him. If it were me, I’d try to work through the process to come up with a good blend. I also have a post coming out in February that walks you through exactly how I blend oils. Maybe that will help you out some. Stay tuned, and thanks for your comment Tania!

hi meagan – thanks for your post – i have a lot to read and learn on mixing blends for essential oils – i am having so much trouble because i make CP soap – and so many essential oils can disappear during the saponification process – i have managed a couple of blends but they are masculine in perfume – i so want to find an easy blend of no more than 3 oils that will be feminine and for some reason conjure up the seep south and scarlett – i dont live anywhere near there or even in that country but i have a perfume in my head that i just cant for the life of me create. Is there any chance you could point me in the right direction???


Essential oil blends are diluted differently depending upon a persons age and the use you have for it. For example, an infant would need a 1% dilution where an older child would do fine with a 2.5% dilution. Adults are usually around a 5% dilution. These dilutions would be for massage oils or therapeutic uses. For cleaning or air fresheners, you may use the 5% dilution or stronger… it just depends on where it’s being used and how.

Yes, vegetable oils or other forms of fat are the best way to properly dilute essential oils. I believe some aromatherapists say that mixing EOs with heavy whipping cream and adding that to baths is acceptable and safe as the fat in the cream helps disperse the oil, but as far as putting EOs on your skin goes… diluting them in a carrier oil is best. You can find some oils that aren’t greasy. I believe they’re called “dry oils.” Rosehip seed oil is an example, and there are several others. Maybe Google it to get some other examples. Hope this answers your question.
NOW® essential oil blends make it easy for you to enjoy a variety of natural essences. The oils used in these blends have been carefully chosen and precisely mixed by our master aromatherapists to provide a scentsational balance of aromas that complement each other, and any mood, perfectly. As with all of our essential oils, these essential oil blends are clean, non-GMO, carefully sourced, quality assured, and purity tested.
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